Prep Walls for Paint, so what are you waiting for

Preparing the walls and surfaces in a room before you paint can save you headaches down the road, and it’s easy enough to do, so what are you waiting for?

1. Wash the walls. Use a cleanser that doesn’t require rinsing and you’ll save yourself some time. Instead of climbing up on a ladder to clean the upper part of the wall, use a nice clean sponge mop to reach those high areas.

2. Once the walls are washed and dry, check them for stains. You may be able to remove small grease stains with a cotton ball dipped in rubbing alcohol. For larger stains, seal them up with a stain sealing primer. You can clean crayon marks off of the walls with some baking soda on a damp cloth.

3. Remove switch plates and outlet covers. To make the job easier, have some tape and a pen on hand. As you take one down, tape the screws to the back, and on another piece of tape, mark the location that you took the cover from.

4. Smear a coat of petroleum jelly over door handles and hinges to help protect them from splatters.

Peeling Paint I’ll show you what to do.

It could be a poor paint job, the weather or a host of other things. But small areas of peeling paint shouldn’t be ignored; I’ll show you what to do.

STEP 1: The first step in fixing this paint problem is to scrape away as much of the paint as you can to reveal the bare wood underneath. This step will ensure that your new paint has something to grip and you won’t end up with the same problem next year.

STEP 2: Once you’re done scraping, wipe down the area with a damp cloth and let it dry.

STEP 3: The secret to patching is in the priming, just like a room you will need to cut in and fill. Load your brush with some paint and cut in along the edges of each board.

STEP 4: Work the paint into the crevice where the boards meet each other along the top and bottom of each board, feathering into the paint that is not peeling.

STEP 5: Once that’s done, use a small roller and long, even strokes to cover the length of each board. Work with the grain of the wood.

STEP 6: Allow the primer to dry for several hours, and repeat the process with your house paint.

Patching Drywall You just need the right steps!

Patching drywall is not as hard as it might seem. You just need the right steps!

1. Use a drywall knife to cut out the damaged section of the wall. Cut a nice even square and pull it away from the wall.

2. Make backers for your patch by cutting some one-by-two (1×2) boards so that they are a couple inches longer than the hole.

3. Insert one of the backers through the hole and hold it flush against the inside of the wall, on the top of the hole. Use a drywall screw at each end to secure the board to the wall. Then repeat the process for the bottom of the hole.

4. Cut your patch from a scrap of drywall using your damaged section as a template if possible.

5. Carefully tip the patch into place so it fits securely in the hole, and use some more drywall screws to secure it to the backers.

6. Use some self sticking fiberglass tape to seal the seams of the patch. Then cover the tape with spackle. Allow it to dry and then sand the surface. Apply two more coats of spackle, sanding it after each has dried for a flawless finish.

Patch Plaster easy to fix with just a couple of things

Cracked plaster is a sign that your house might be settling. Luckily, it’s pretty easy to fix with just a couple of things:

1. Use a utility knife to clean away loose plaster. After that is done, vacuum all of the dust out of the crack.

2. Wet a small cloth or paintbrush with some water and run it along the length of the crack.

3. Use your putty knife to push enough spackle into the crack to fill it up.

4. Smooth the repair out by running the putty knife at a slight angle along the length of the crack.

5. Let the repair dry for a couple of hours. When dry, check the crack to make sure that the putty didn’t shrink while it was drying. If it did, just repeat the process.

Painting Woodwork Well I have a few ideas to give you the know how to get a great finish.

Painting woodwork is a big project. Well I have a few ideas to give you the know how to get a great finish.

1. Whether you’re painting new wood or repainting the existing woodwork the key to a nice result is good prep work. First, sand. A palm sander will help make quick work of this tedious task. For tight spots use a sanding block, or even a nail file.

2. Clean the sanding dust away with a tack cloth.

3. Choose your paint tools wisely, a sash or trim brush will do a nice job, but if you’re a novice you might want to opt for a foam brush. Their chiseled ends make it easier for you to cut into tight corners and you won’t end up with brush strokes in your finish.

4. If you’re working on new wood you need to prime the surface well with a sealing primer. This is important for a couple of reasons: you’ll seal knotholes so that they won’t bleed through your finish coat. Plus, a good primer will cut the number of paint coats that you need and primer is less expensive than paint!

5. If you don’t feel like taping off before you start, use a squeegee as a guide. Simply hold it in place, paint along the edge then move to the next area. The rubber blade will seal up imperfections in the wall surface. A tip, if you coat the blade with a petroleum jelly before you start it will be a lot easier when you go to clean it up.

Painting Windows Here are some hints to make the job easier.

Does painting the woodwork on your windows seem like a hassle? Here are some hints to make the job easier.

1. Scrape old paint away with a putty knife.

2. Use sandpaper to even out the surface.

3. Brush away any dust and dirt.

4. Rub a damp bar of soap over the glass. This way if the paint splatters while you’re working, it won’t stick (you can also wipe petroleum jelly on your windows for the same protection).

5. Carefully paint along the window frame, and then allow the paint to dry. If you’re working on an inside window, to prevent them from becoming painted shut, open and close them several times while they’re drying.

6. If you get latex paint on your hands, just spray some shaving cream on them, rub thoroughly and then rinse. The paint will come right off!

Painting Trimwork I have a couple of easy ways to fix those problems.

If your knotholes are showing through, and there are cracks and gouges in your trim work, I have a couple of easy ways to fix those problems.

1. Knotholes are a really common problem on painted trim. They bleed right through the paint and look awful. To cover them up, paint a coat of stain sealing primer over the knotholes and let it dry. This type of specialized primer will seal in stains and knotholes so they won’t bleed through again.

2. To fill cracks and gouges in that woodwork, mix a small amount of paint with a little kitchen flour. Use the paste and a putty knife to go over all of the imperfections. The cool thing about the solution is that by mixing the filler with paint, it will blend easily and be ready for a fresh coat of paint in no time.

3. Now all that’s left to do is paint that trim. Make sure that you tape off the surrounding walls so you don’t end up having to paint them too, and then go to work. Use a good brush so you don’t get a lot of stroke marks.

4. To paint baseboards, sit on a skateboard and scoot yourself along the wall. It’s easier on your back than squatting and crawling around on the floor.

Painting Tips I have some simple tips that will help you out while you are painting.

You can run into snags with any project and painting is no exception. I have some simple tips that will help you out while you are painting.

1. If you forgot to grab a paint stick at the store, don’t worry. Grab a wire coat hanger. Bend it in half so you have two legs and a handle. Use that to mix the paint. I recommend the heavier metal hangers as opposed to the lightweight white variety.

2. Before you pour paint, put a strip of duct tape around the edge of the can; then pour. Let the excess drip back inside and remove the tape. You’ll have a nice clean rim.

3. Prep, if you need to paint window frames it can take forever to tape them all up. Instead try grabbing your lip balm. Just run it around the edges of all the windows. This will allow you to simply wipe away any drips when you’re finished.

4. Hard to reach corners? No problem, and no need to perch yourself on a ladder. Tape a fine tipped paintbrush to an extension pole and use it to access those out of reach areas. If a hard to reach spot is a ceiling line try taping a chisel-tip foam brush for nice clean edge.


Painting tips & tricks

Rub petroleum jelly on the hinges and door knobs before you start to paint a door. If you get paint on them, they will wipe off easily.

To keep white paint from yellowing, add 2 drops of black paint to each Gallon of white.

When painting ceilings, cut a child’s rubber ball in half and put your paint brush in one of the halves to catch the drips.

An old pair of swimming goggles will protect your eyes from paint splatters and drips when painting ceilings.

When painting, protect your hands and face with moisturizer. Cleanup will be easier and the moisturizer will prevent paint from seeping into the pores.

To stop paint from dripping, punch a few holes in the rim of the paint can. When the brush is wiped against the edge, the paint flows back into the can. The lid covers the holes so the paint won’t dry out.

Before pouring paint from a can, cover the rim with masking tape. After pouring, remove the tape — the rim will be clean and the cover will fit tightly.

To remove lumps from paint: Cut a piece of screen to fit the inside of the paint can. Set it on top of the paint and let it float down to the bottom of the can. It will take all the lumps with it, trapping them at the bottom of the can.

When painting a room, dip a small card into the paint so that you have the exact colour with you and can match accessories in store.

When painting inside corners, trim the paint brush bristles to a V to save strokes and spread paint more easily.

When you poke a paint brush into corners or allow it to rest on the bottom of the paint can, the bristles curl and stray. To straighten natural bristles (not synthetics), try wrapping the brush in a couple of thicknesses of damp cloth and press gently with an iron. The steam and cloth binding do the job. Only light pressure is needed. Let the bristles cool before you unwrap the brush.

When painting old woodwork fill in the holes or cracks with a mixture of flour and some of the paint you are using. It hardens like cement and matches perfectly.

Essential Tips & Tricks to Paint Your Room

The best time for painting your room is summer. While it’s warm, breezy and dry, You can get started on that painting job that’s been looming all year. To help you in completing this feat, we’ve put together 10 Essential tips and tricks to painting your room.

1. Clean Walls: Before you start painting your room you need to clean the walls of your room. Remove dust, dirt, and grease spots that have been stuck on your walls, you need to clean it with water, a little mild dishwashing detergent, and a cellulose sponge. Rinse the walls with clean water to remove the soap residue.

2. Tape the trim, window, and door frames: You need to buy some painter’s tape, which is used to save the surface which you don’t want to paint. Tapes can be applied up to a week ahead. You can remove the tape after the painting, but before the wall dries so that you don’t peel off any paint with it.

3. Use the W technique: For efficiency painting, you need to start in the corner of a wall and roll on a three-by-three-foot W pattern, then fill it in without lifting the roller. You need to continue in sections until you’re finished. And you need to paint one wall at a time.

4. Overnight Storage: If you are done a painting for the day, but you still have more to do tomorrow, then simply brush or roll off the excess paint, then tightly wrap them in plastic food wrap. Place the wrapped brushes and roller sleeves in the refrigerator to keep them fresh. Then, whenever you want to paint, simply remove the gear from cold storage 30 minutes before painting, and it’ll be supple and ready for use.

5. Create a paint brush holder: You can make a paint can with brush holder and handle, as it is very convenient while painting. If everything fits in a single bucket. You can make a paint holder by cutting out the side of the milk jug, you can keep the paintbrush upside down in the milk jug mouth.

6. Trim off the edges of roller: If you are planning to use old or used paint roller, then you need to trim off the edges of the paint roller. As it will give you smooth finished look. If you use the used paint roller as such then it is likely to give you an ugly edge on your paint job.

7. Paint Vaseline: You can paint Vaseline over some tiny areas you don’t want to be painted, like screws or hinges. Lay it on thick, and then start painting as normal. After the paint has dried, go over the area with a paper towel and the paint will wipe right off! This is a great trick for spray-painting!

https://www.coatsofcolours.com/

Happy painting!!

Painting Terra Cotta

If you have new terra cotta pots and you want them to look old and weathered, but you don’t have the patience, I have the answer, outdoor paints. If you have new terra cotta pots and you want them to look old and weathered, but you don’t have the patience, I have the answer, outdoor paints.

1. Check your local paint or craft store for acrylic paint that can be used on metal, wood, concrete, stone and you guessed it – terra cotta!

2. Take a naturally weathered pot and look at the deposits and discoloration; and see how they appear.

3. Then squeeze some paint on to a paper plate and use a sponge to apply it to your pot in a pattern to match the naturally weathered pot.

4. You’ll probably want a couple of different colors to layer on for more natural look. Once you’re happy with the results, simply let them dry.

5. These paints are also great for labeling your plants; simply paint the name of the plant onto the front or the top rim of the pot to make it a container and a marker all in one!


Painting tips & tricks

Rub petroleum jelly on the hinges and door knobs before you start to paint a door. If you get paint on them, they will wipe off easily.

To keep white paint from yellowing, add 2 drops of black paint to each Gallon of white.

When painting ceilings, cut a child’s rubber ball in half and put your paint brush in one of the halves to catch the drips.

An old pair of swimming goggles will protect your eyes from paint splatters and drips when painting ceilings.

When painting, protect your hands and face with moisturizer. Cleanup will be easier and the moisturizer will prevent paint from seeping into the pores.

To stop paint from dripping, punch a few holes in the rim of the paint can. When the brush is wiped against the edge, the paint flows back into the can. The lid covers the holes so the paint won’t dry out.

Before pouring paint from a can, cover the rim with masking tape. After pouring, remove the tape — the rim will be clean and the cover will fit tightly.

To remove lumps from paint: Cut a piece of screen to fit the inside of the paint can. Set it on top of the paint and let it float down to the bottom of the can. It will take all the lumps with it, trapping them at the bottom of the can.

When painting a room, dip a small card into the paint so that you have the exact colour with you and can match accessories in store.

When painting inside corners, trim the paint brush bristles to a V to save strokes and spread paint more easily.

When you poke a paint brush into corners or allow it to rest on the bottom of the paint can, the bristles curl and stray. To straighten natural bristles (not synthetics), try wrapping the brush in a couple of thicknesses of damp cloth and press gently with an iron. The steam and cloth binding do the job. Only light pressure is needed. Let the bristles cool before you unwrap the brush.

When painting old woodwork fill in the holes or cracks with a mixture of flour and some of the paint you are using. It hardens like cement and matches perfectly.