7 Home Repairs for $15


Keeping your home in tip-top condition doesn’t have to mean taking on big, expensive projects. Here are 15 repairs that can be accomplished for less than $15. Despite relatively small investments of time and money, each of these repairs helps make your home more comfortable, attractive and cost efficient.


Repair a Sink Sprayer: $5 or less
Mineral deposits in the aerator can rob a sink sprayer of its power. Unscrew the aerator from the sprayer and scrub it out with a toothbrush, then soak it in vinegar overnight. If that doesn’t solve the problem, turn off the water to the fixture and remove the faucet handle and spout. Inside the faucet body, you’ll find a small, round diverter valve. Scrub that valve with a toothbrush, coat new O-rings and washers with heat-proof grease, and reassemble the faucet.


Patch a Hole in Drywall: $8 or less
You can fix small holes and minor drywall damage in less than an hour. Scrape the area smooth, using a putty knife. Use the putty knife to fill small holes with ultra-light spackle. Sand when dry. Cover larger holes with nylon drywall tape, then use a broadknife to smooth a coat of joint compound over the area. When the compound is dry, add a second coat, feathering out the edges. Allow to dry. Sand, prime, and paint the repair.


Replace an Interior Door Handle: $15 & Up
When cleaning the mechanism isn’t enough to keep a doorknob from sticking, it’s time to replace the knob. Remove the screws holding the cover plates to the door, then pull the doorknob apart. Outside the door, insert the stem of the new doorknob into the latch case — the mechanism inside the hole in the door. Inside the door, fit the interior knob over the spindle and align the stems with the screw holes. Install a screw into the hole closest to the door edge. Install the other screw, and test the doorknob. If the latch sticks, loosen both screws slightly.


Weatherstrip a Window: $15 or less
This cost-effective fix is super simple, thanks to peel-and-stick weatherstripping. Remove old weatherstrip and thoroughly clean all surfaces. Cut self-adhesive foam or rubber compression strips to fit the outside edges of the window stops. Peel off the backing paper and press the weatherstripping into place.


Caulk a Bathtub: $15 or less
Caulk seals the joint between the bathtub and the wall, which keeps moisture out of the walls. To replace failed caulk, tape the edges of the joint with painter’s tape, and use a utility knife scrape out the old caulk. Thoroughly clean the joint, using a solution of hot water and bleach, then dry the area with a clean rag. Fill the tub with water to open the joint to its maximum capacity. Squeeze a thin bead of caulk into the joint, then use your index finger to smooth it out. Remove the tape.


Unclog a Showerhead: $5 or less
Mineral deposits can reduce a shower’s water pressure and even change its spray pattern. When this happens, an inexpensive jug of white vinegar holds the answer. Remove the showerhead, and use the end of a paper clip to scrape deposits out of the inlet holes. Soak the showerhead in vinegar overnight, then replace it. The pressure should be back.

Original Source