Protect Your Clild’s from Lead Poisoning

Lead in Paint, Dust, and Soil

Lead is a highly toxic metal that was used for many years in products found in and around our homes. Lead may cause a range of health effects, from behavioral problems and learning disabilities, to seizures and death. Children 6 years old and under are most at risk, because their bodies are growing quickly.

Research suggests that the primary sources of lead exposure for most children are:
> deteriorating lead-based paint,
> lead contaminated dust, and
> lead contaminated residential soil.

EPA is playing a major role in addressing these residential lead hazards. In 1978, there were nearly three to four million children with elevated blood lead levels in the United States. In the 1990s, that number had dropped to 434,000 kids, and it continues to decline. While we still have a significant challenge, EPA is very proud of how federal, state, tribal, and private sector partners have coordinated efforts with the public to better protect our children.

Since the 1980’s, EPA and its federal partners have phased out lead in gasoline, reduced lead in drinking water, reduced lead in industrial air pollution, and banned or limited lead used in consumer products, including residential paint. States and municipalities have set up programs to identify and treat lead poisoned children and to rehabilitate deteriorated housing. Parents, too, have greatly helped to reduce lead exposures to their children by cleaning and maintaining homes, having their children’s blood lead levels checked, and promoting proper nutrition. The Agency’s Lead Awareness Program continues to work to protect human health and the environment against the dangers of lead by developing regulations, conducting research, and designing educational outreach efforts and materials.
More information call: (NLIC) at 1-800-424-LEAD (5323).

Choosing the Right Primer for the Job

What Does Primer Do?

Provides a uniform and attractive paint finish.

Blocks tannin, water, grease and smoke stains that can bleed through your topcoat.

Improves adhesion of the topcoat. Your paint will last longer and look better.

Before you use any primer, properly clean the surface.

New wood – If your wood isn’t seriously stained, use a high-quality latex primer or an oil-based primer. If you have wood that is stained or you are painting redwood or cedar, use a stain-blocking primer.

Painted wood – If your paint is in very good condition, a primer may not be needed. However, if you have exposed wood, chalking or chipped paint, use an oil-based primer. Before you prime, scrape away as much chipped paint as possible and wash off any chalk. (Just because you are using a primer doesn’t mean you get to skip surface preparation.)

Weathered wood – Use a high-quality latex or oil-based primer. Sand and scrape away as much paint as possible. When you start to see new wood fibers, start priming.

Masonry block – Fill a fresh surface with block filler before painting. If repainting, scrape off any loose or peeling paint and cover with latex paint. Use a block filler only if the paint has been completely scraped off.

Aluminum and galvanized steel – If your surface is rusty, remove the rust and apply a latex or oil-based, corrosion-resistant primer. If the surface is new and rust-free, you can apply a high-quality latex paint and no primer.

Drywall – Use a latex primer. Don’t use an oil-based primer unless you are putting up wallpaper or covering a stain. Oil-based primers raise the grain of the drywall and make the finish look uneven.

Stains – Crayons, water, smoke and grease can bleed through the topcoat. Prime these areas with a stain-blocking or stain-killing primer. Oil-based stain killers work the best on water stains and for spot priming. Latex stain-blocking primers work better on large areas and hold up better on exterior surfaces. Pigmented shellac primer works well to block smoke and soot damage as well as to block animal urine smells.

Shiny surfaces – Bonding primers will stick to glass, tile, Formica and previously painted surfaces. Use bonding primers for interior surfaces only. They tend to crack when exposed to the elements because they aren’t flexible.

Previously painted rooms

Step by Step Guide To Painting.

Step One: Surface preparation :

The very first thing you want to do is check the surfaces for imperfections. These surface imperfections are usually old nail holes, cracks, cuts or nicks, joint separations or just badly covered drywall tape. Be sure to mix the drywall compound thoroughly before you start.

Step Two: Spot prime surface where patches are:

Start to prime in any corner. Load the roller, place it about 2 feet from the floor and roll upward to the top then back down to the floor. Keep your motion consistent. Top to bottom, no part way up rolls. Be sure to feather out the paint. I usually roll 1 line then move over a half a roller with the dry roller. This spreads the paint out reasonably well. Try to roll as much as you can on the surface, leaving minimal brushwork. After all the rolling is complete, cut the surfaces in with a brush.

Step three: Surface preparation :

Now check to find any nail holes, nicks or cuts that might have been overlooked earlier. Use drywall compound to fill. Fill if necessary then sand complete surfaces. Dust off the surfaces and proceed to he next step.

Step Four: Applying first coat of paint :

Take a brush and cut in. As you finish brushing one surface wall at a time roll immediately. Move to the next surface wall and repeat procedure until all surfaces are completed. Proceed to he next step.

Step Five: Surface preparation :

Now check to find any imperfections that might have been overlooked earlier. Use drywall compound. Fill if necessary then lightly sand completed surfaces. Dust off the surfaces and proceed to he next step.

Step Six: Applying Second Coat Of Paint :

The final coat of paint. Take a brush and cut in. As you finish brushing one surface wall at a time roll immediately. Move to the next surface wall and repeat procedure until all surfaces are completed. Proceed to he next room or clean up.

Previously painted or stained concrete

1. Sand surface using large pad sander available at most rental outlets or building supply stores (coarse grit).

2. Wash with T.S.P General Household Cleaner and rinse well.

3. Follow steps 2 thru 6 as above.

4. Apply concrete stain or epoxy concrete paint.

5. Where car tires are resting, place rubber matting.

Preparing concrete for painting or staining

1. Wash with Muriatic Acid 2/3 water, 1/3 acid.

2. Puddle out on surface and spread with broom. Allow to sit for 5 to 15 minutes. A foaming action will occur.

3. Scrub with stiff bristle brush.

4. Rinse well with hose.

5. Note: do not do this project in bright hot sunshine.

6. Apply concrete stain or clear solvent based concrete sealer (penetrating type).

OR

1: Wash with Bio-Wash Simple Wash available at most building supply stores.

2. Follow steps 2 thru 6 as above.

Preparing concrete for painting or staining

Preparing concrete for painting or staining

Raw Concrete up to 5 Years Old

1. Wash with Muriatic Acid 2/3 water, 1/3 acid.

(Caution: Add acid to water not water to acid. Wear safety clothing and rubber gloves.)

2. Puddle out on surface and spread with broom. Allow to sit for 5 to 15 minutes. A foaming action will occur.

3. Scrub with stiff bristle brush.

4. Rinse well with hose.

5. Note: do not do this project in bright hot sunshine.

6. Apply concrete stain or clear solvent based concrete sealer (penetrating type).

OR

1: Wash with Bio-Wash Simple Wash available at most building supply stores.

2. Follow steps 2 thru 6 as above.


Previously painted or stained concrete

1. Sand surface using large pad sander available at most rental outlets or building supply stores (coarse grit).

2. Wash with T.S.P General Household Cleaner and rinse well.

3. Follow steps 2 thru 6 as above.

4. Apply concrete stain or epoxy concrete paint.

5. Where car tires are resting, place rubber matting.

How to Preparing Woodwork for Painting

Prepping woodwork for painting isn’t difficult, but wood trim and other details can have lots of little hills and valleys. You’ll need to clean, patch, and sand the woodwork before you can paint it, so a little patience is needed to make sure the job comes out looking great. Liquid deglossers work well for prepping glossy surfaces such as enamel paints, but pay attention to the manufacturer’s instructions – the deglosser can’t be left on too long.

1. To start, wash the woodwork with TSP solution or a phosphate-free substitute, and then rinse it thoroughly. Be sure to wear protective gloves and safety gear when using harsh cleaners and chemicals. Scrape away any peeling or loose paint. If your woodwork is badly chipped, it’s probably best to remove the old finish entirely by sanding it or stripping it.

 

2. Use a putty knife to press some latex wood patch or spackling compound into any nail holes, dents, or other scratches. Colored wood patch material also can be used. Let the putty dry thoroughly.

 

 

3. Sand the surfaces with 150-grit sandpaper until they are smooth to the touch. Wipe the woodwork with a tack cloth before priming and painting.

How to Paint Windows

Here are a few simple tips to simplify the job of painting your windows.

1. You will need a small brush for this project. Depending on the size of the molding, a 1 ½ inch to 2 ½ inch angled brush will allow you to “cut in” on the edges and hard-to-reach parts of the window frame.

2. Remove the hardware you don’t want painted, saving it in a small plastic bag or container so they don’t get lost.

3. Work from the top of the window down and start by painting the movable portion of the window.

4. Paint the sash and the trim first, leaving the windowsill last to avoid touching wet paint.

5. Paint slowly and carefully. Avoid getting paint in the sliding tracks and inadvertently “gluing” your window shut with paint.


For best results, ALWAYS READ THE PAINT CAN LABEL. Professionals read the paint can labels to get the paint manufacturers’ most up-to-date information and instructions on the use of each specific paint. Every paint is different, and the labels provide important information, such as the average coverage area per gallon, drying times, number of coats needed, and surface preparation requirements. The labels also give specific safety information that should be carefully adhered to.


If you have windows that move up and down:

1. Raise the lower sash up and lower the upper sash down and paint the lower half of the upper sash.

2. Raise the upper sash back up and lower the lower sash and paint the upper half of the upper sash.

3. Raise the lower sash a bit and paint the lower sash.

4. Paint the trim and the windowsill once the painted sashes are dry.

When you have finished painting and the paint is dry, use a window paint scraper to remove any paint that has gotten on the glass.

Painting Wood

Have you ever noticed when you get a manicure that they always buff your nails before applying the nail polish? The same is true when you paint wood. You want to rough up the surface area so that the paint has a better opportunity to stick. Do this with fine-grit sandpaper. (See below.)

SANDPAPER CHART

GRITS
MEANING
USED FOR

35-60
Coarse
Very heavy sanding, stripping, and roughing up the surface

80-120
Medium
Medium smoothing of the surface. Roughs up the surface so that paint can adhere. Removes smaller imperfections in surface.

150-180
Fine
Very light sanding and smoothing. Used for final sanding before buffing and/or finishing.

220-240
Very fine
Extremely light sanding and smoothing. Used for sanding between coats of stain or sealer. Gives a light buffing.

280-320
Extra fine
Even lighter sanding and smoothing. Used to remove tiny imperfections or dust spots before the finished coats of stain or sealer.

360-600
Super fine
Fine sanding and smoothing. More like buffing for a shiny finish (like you would use on your nails). This can be used to remove miniscule surface imperfections and tiny scratches.

How to prepare a wood surface for painting:

1. Apply wood filler to any area needing repair. Let it dry according to the manufacturer’s label. You can also test an area by running your finger across it. If nothing sticks to your finger, it’s dry.

2. Once the wood filler has dried, sand the area with fine sandpaper (150 grit) until smooth or until it matches the surface of the wood.

3. Wipe the area clean with a damp cloth.

4. Apply paint. If you have wood that you would like to repaint, you may want to simply paint over the existing paint, which is good for a variety of projects. This simply requires cleaning the wood with soap and water before getting started, but don’t forget to lightly sand.
For more detailed projects, it is best to strip the wood and start fresh to avoid a thick, unattractive buildup. There are two main ways of doing this: heat stripping and chemical stripping.

TIP: Make sure that you always use primer before painting any surface. Because different surfaces (wall, wood, etc.) are all different, they soak up paint differently and, if not done properly, will leave you with an unfinished look, if you are varnishing wood, use a wood sealer to do the same job as primer.

Painting over Wallpaper

You don’t necessarily have to remove your old wallpaper to paint your walls a different color.

Removing wallpaper-especially if it’s been on the walls for years-can cause unexpected damage to your walls. But if it’s in good condition and has no signs of adhesion failure, there’s no reason to invest a lot of time and effort in removing it before painting your walls.

Also, by leaving the wallpaper in place, your walls will stay in their current condition, and you’ll be able to start painting without delay.

Prep before Painting

It’s vital to prepare your walls carefully before painting. Follow these simple steps to ensure the best results:

• Start by replacing any damaged sections and adding adhesive to loose pieces to minimize the chance the paper will fall.
• Add a thin line of clear caulk around the perimeter of the walls, at the joint seam where the paper meets the floor and ceiling. This will help seal the edges and keep the paper from peeling after you’ve painted.
• Cover heavily textured paper with a thin coat of joint compound (spackle). This material will help smooth out the surface so that the texture won’t show through the paint.
• Gently sand down the seams of the wallpaper so they’re not too noticeable.
• Apply a coat of oil-based primer to the entire surface of the walls before painting. This helps seal the adhesive within the paper and away from the moisture in the paint.
• The wallpaper is now ready for painting. Because the moisture in latex paint can sometimes loosen wallpaper glue, causing bubbles or peeling, you should use oil-based paint.
Finally, it’s time to enjoy your freshly painted room.

Painting Wood Tips and Tricks

Painting wood is a quite common project for many people. The problem with painting it, though, is that not everyone does it correctly and therefore the finished project is not as good as it could be. Think of wood as a sponge. Many types of wood will soak up the paint and then leave you with just a residue like painting. But, if you want your wood to have a painted look, there are things that you can do to allow the wood to react correctly. No matter if you are painting wood floors or if you are painting your kitchen cabinets, following a few common rules to painting wood will leave you a satisfied customer.

In any painting project, you first need to insure that the woods used are healthy. With wood, you need to protect against such things as mildew and peeling. Check your surface to make sure that it is whole and ready to be painted. You can use proper cleaning methods as well as specially made primers to help you seal the wood as well. Another common problem with painting projects with wood is Tanning staining. Some woods are more likely to have this issue, such as cedar and redwood. What you need to realize about this is that it is not necessarily related to the paint as it is related to the wood’s surface. That means to repair it; you’ll need to control the humidity and other moisture problems with the wood prior to getting started and it will need to be tanning resistant.

Painting wood is an exciting project. It can transform a room, a home, or even the exterior of a home within a few brush strokes. Properly mixing and applying the paint is important as is using high quality paint. You will need to insure that your painting area is clean and sealed as well.

There are many common wood painting projects out there. Painting wood furniture is one of them. Flooring, cabinetry, and even molding are all common projects that you may be looking to take on. And, you can do this with some skill and good materials. The result will be one that is beautiful every time you follow the specific directions of your painting project.