How to Paint Windows

Here are a few simple tips to simplify the job of painting your windows.

1. You will need a small brush for this project. Depending on the size of the molding, a 1 ½ inch to 2 ½ inch angled brush will allow you to “cut in” on the edges and hard-to-reach parts of the window frame.

2. Remove the hardware you don’t want painted, saving it in a small plastic bag or container so they don’t get lost.

3. Work from the top of the window down and start by painting the movable portion of the window.

4. Paint the sash and the trim first, leaving the windowsill last to avoid touching wet paint.

5. Paint slowly and carefully. Avoid getting paint in the sliding tracks and inadvertently “gluing” your window shut with paint.


For best results, ALWAYS READ THE PAINT CAN LABEL. Professionals read the paint can labels to get the paint manufacturers’ most up-to-date information and instructions on the use of each specific paint. Every paint is different, and the labels provide important information, such as the average coverage area per gallon, drying times, number of coats needed, and surface preparation requirements. The labels also give specific safety information that should be carefully adhered to.


If you have windows that move up and down:

1. Raise the lower sash up and lower the upper sash down and paint the lower half of the upper sash.

2. Raise the upper sash back up and lower the lower sash and paint the upper half of the upper sash.

3. Raise the lower sash a bit and paint the lower sash.

4. Paint the trim and the windowsill once the painted sashes are dry.

When you have finished painting and the paint is dry, use a window paint scraper to remove any paint that has gotten on the glass.

Painting Wood

Have you ever noticed when you get a manicure that they always buff your nails before applying the nail polish? The same is true when you paint wood. You want to rough up the surface area so that the paint has a better opportunity to stick. Do this with fine-grit sandpaper. (See below.)

SANDPAPER CHART

GRITS
MEANING
USED FOR

35-60
Coarse
Very heavy sanding, stripping, and roughing up the surface

80-120
Medium
Medium smoothing of the surface. Roughs up the surface so that paint can adhere. Removes smaller imperfections in surface.

150-180
Fine
Very light sanding and smoothing. Used for final sanding before buffing and/or finishing.

220-240
Very fine
Extremely light sanding and smoothing. Used for sanding between coats of stain or sealer. Gives a light buffing.

280-320
Extra fine
Even lighter sanding and smoothing. Used to remove tiny imperfections or dust spots before the finished coats of stain or sealer.

360-600
Super fine
Fine sanding and smoothing. More like buffing for a shiny finish (like you would use on your nails). This can be used to remove miniscule surface imperfections and tiny scratches.

How to prepare a wood surface for painting:

1. Apply wood filler to any area needing repair. Let it dry according to the manufacturer’s label. You can also test an area by running your finger across it. If nothing sticks to your finger, it’s dry.

2. Once the wood filler has dried, sand the area with fine sandpaper (150 grit) until smooth or until it matches the surface of the wood.

3. Wipe the area clean with a damp cloth.

4. Apply paint. If you have wood that you would like to repaint, you may want to simply paint over the existing paint, which is good for a variety of projects. This simply requires cleaning the wood with soap and water before getting started, but don’t forget to lightly sand.
For more detailed projects, it is best to strip the wood and start fresh to avoid a thick, unattractive buildup. There are two main ways of doing this: heat stripping and chemical stripping.

TIP: Make sure that you always use primer before painting any surface. Because different surfaces (wall, wood, etc.) are all different, they soak up paint differently and, if not done properly, will leave you with an unfinished look, if you are varnishing wood, use a wood sealer to do the same job as primer.

Painting over Wallpaper

You don’t necessarily have to remove your old wallpaper to paint your walls a different color.

Removing wallpaper-especially if it’s been on the walls for years-can cause unexpected damage to your walls. But if it’s in good condition and has no signs of adhesion failure, there’s no reason to invest a lot of time and effort in removing it before painting your walls.

Also, by leaving the wallpaper in place, your walls will stay in their current condition, and you’ll be able to start painting without delay.

Prep before Painting

It’s vital to prepare your walls carefully before painting. Follow these simple steps to ensure the best results:

• Start by replacing any damaged sections and adding adhesive to loose pieces to minimize the chance the paper will fall.
• Add a thin line of clear caulk around the perimeter of the walls, at the joint seam where the paper meets the floor and ceiling. This will help seal the edges and keep the paper from peeling after you’ve painted.
• Cover heavily textured paper with a thin coat of joint compound (spackle). This material will help smooth out the surface so that the texture won’t show through the paint.
• Gently sand down the seams of the wallpaper so they’re not too noticeable.
• Apply a coat of oil-based primer to the entire surface of the walls before painting. This helps seal the adhesive within the paper and away from the moisture in the paint.
• The wallpaper is now ready for painting. Because the moisture in latex paint can sometimes loosen wallpaper glue, causing bubbles or peeling, you should use oil-based paint.
Finally, it’s time to enjoy your freshly painted room.

Painting Wood Tips and Tricks

Painting wood is a quite common project for many people. The problem with painting it, though, is that not everyone does it correctly and therefore the finished project is not as good as it could be. Think of wood as a sponge. Many types of wood will soak up the paint and then leave you with just a residue like painting. But, if you want your wood to have a painted look, there are things that you can do to allow the wood to react correctly. No matter if you are painting wood floors or if you are painting your kitchen cabinets, following a few common rules to painting wood will leave you a satisfied customer.

In any painting project, you first need to insure that the woods used are healthy. With wood, you need to protect against such things as mildew and peeling. Check your surface to make sure that it is whole and ready to be painted. You can use proper cleaning methods as well as specially made primers to help you seal the wood as well. Another common problem with painting projects with wood is Tanning staining. Some woods are more likely to have this issue, such as cedar and redwood. What you need to realize about this is that it is not necessarily related to the paint as it is related to the wood’s surface. That means to repair it; you’ll need to control the humidity and other moisture problems with the wood prior to getting started and it will need to be tanning resistant.

Painting wood is an exciting project. It can transform a room, a home, or even the exterior of a home within a few brush strokes. Properly mixing and applying the paint is important as is using high quality paint. You will need to insure that your painting area is clean and sealed as well.

There are many common wood painting projects out there. Painting wood furniture is one of them. Flooring, cabinetry, and even molding are all common projects that you may be looking to take on. And, you can do this with some skill and good materials. The result will be one that is beautiful every time you follow the specific directions of your painting project.

Painting Wood Furniture

Do you have some dingy, old wood furniture that is just too comfortable to get rid of but might do well with a fresh coat of paint? Many people are painting wood furniture and giving it a new life. It can be quite welcoming to clean and paint this furniture. It doesn’t even have to be a difficult job! So, how can you go about painting wood? Here are some helpful tips on how to do so. You’ll find that it can be very rewarding to transform your home’s furniture into something beautiful and lasting.

No matter what type of wood furniture that you need to paint, you simply must paint it only after you have cleaned and repaired any damages. It is important to look for mildew, mold, or other harmful issues on the wood itself. You also need to consider any peeling or cracking in the wood as well. Lastly, consider the moisture or humidity in the area in which you are using the furniture. Drying out and then controlling the amount of humidity that the wood is exposed to will keep it in good condition.

Depending on what type of wood furniture you have and where it is located will help you to choose the proper paints to use on it. When painting wood furniture, you need to take into consideration if it is exposed to the weather, if it is to be stained or painted, and whether or not the type of wood will hold paint well. You can find various types of paint for just about every type of furniture product. When you take the time to choose the right products to use, you’ll end up with a good finished product.

Don’t skip steps either! Many people simply think that a coat of paint is all that is needed to create a new look with their furniture. Some woods need more care and consideration than others. For example, you’ll find many products need primers and others will require etching products to all for the paint to stick to the surface. When you take the time to find the right materials to use and take your time with painting wood furniture, it comes out beautifully and you can turn even the worst looking chair or table into a remarkable piece.

Painting Wood Floors

Painting wood floors is a great way to offer a new look and often times a new life to the woods within your home. For many, it is an excellent way to discover a new and beautiful flooring option for the home. But, where do you begin? While many people first think to call the professional in for this job, you really can do it on your own. With a few skills and a few helpful tips, you can discover a new world under your feet. Here are some things that you can consider first of all.

Painting wood floors is not a small job. Not all wood flooring can or should be painted either. Many times, hardwood floors and laminates will have protective coatings on them to protect them and to give them more durability. But, these coatings will get in the way of your painting. If you have a wood flooring that has a coating like this, you may need to seek the manufacturers advice on how to handle the painting.

Still other wood flooring is troublesome because it has been stained. While many times you can paint over stain, you need to take protective and careful measures to insure that you do not damage the wood in your painting process.

Once you have found out just what your painting entails, you can get started with the task at hand. In most cases, a properly clean and repaired floor is necessary to start with. In these cases, you will find that you will need to prime the wood prior to getting started with painting. You will also need to adjust your type of paint to match the type of wood as well as any protective coating and stain that is on that wood. All in all, painting wood is quite doable, if you take the right measures to get it done correctly.

How to Painting Window Frames

It seems like there’s always a window in need of painting, whether you’re matching a new room scheme or just sprucing things up. The actual painting isn’t difficult, but you should know what you’re getting into before you start. If you can, remove the window frames before painting them. Newer windows are released by pushing them against their spring-loaded jambs. Don’t paint the edges of windows – they’ll slide easier if unpainted. Older windows – those with sash cord weights – are more difficult. You can paint older windows in place, but don’t paint them shut.

1. To paint double-hung windows, you’ll want to remove them from their frames. Newer, spring-mounted windows are released by pushing against the frame. If you have an older window, consider painting it in place.

 

2. Drill holes and insert two nails into the legs of a wooden stepladder, and mount the window easel-style for easy painting. Or, lay the window flat on a bench or sawhorses. Don’t paint the sides or the bottom of the sashes.

 

3. Using a tapered sash brush, begin by painting the wood next to the glass. Use the narrow edge of brush and overlap paint onto the glass to create a weathertight seal.

 

4. Clean any excess paint off the glass with a putty knife wrapped in a clean cloth. Rewrap the knife often so that you always wipe with a clean piece of fabric. Overlap the paint onto the glass about 1/16 of an inch to create a good seal.

 

5. Paint the flat portions of the sashes, then the case moldings, the sill, and the apron. Use slow, careful brush strokes. If you’re painting with the sash in place, you’ll want to avoid getting paint between the sash and frame. For casement windows, open them up completely before painting.

 

6. If you must paint your windows in place, move the painted windows up and down several times during the drying period to keep them from sticking. You can use a putty knife to avoid touching the painted surfaces.

Painting Trim

Painting trim is one of the many ways you can liven up interiors or exteriors. Use an accent color that complements the main colors of your wall and ceiling surfaces, or paint your trim white to embolden and emphasize the other colors. Typically, working with trim requires a brush and is slower going than painting large surfaces such as walls. Take your time – it’s worth the patience.

1. Protect your wall and floor surfaces with a wide wallboard knife, with a plastic shielding tool, or masking tape.

 

 

 

2. Be sure to wipe the paint off your wallboard knife or shielding tool each time it’s moved to keep paint from getting on trim and surrounding areas.

 

 

 

3. Paint deep-patterned surfaces such as ornate trim and moldings with a stiff-bristled brush, like a stenciling brush. Use small circular strokes to help penetrate into the recesses.

Painting Tips for Interior Painting

Foam Rollers > Foam rollers can really assist in getting a beautiful smooth wall finish. They are easy to use and spatter very little. Try them for your next paint job! (They won’t work on heavily textured or rough surfaces however.) Foam brushes on the other hand are mainly useful only for small paint jobs since they may not stand up to doing an entire room.

Pad Painters > Smooth pad painters are extremely useful and offer neat application and simple cleanup.

Just make sure you only ‘float’ the pad on top of the paint to load it, since once the pad is submerged into the paint it can become a drippy mess and you’ll need to take it apart, clean it, and start over.

Rollers > Look for rollers with plastic interiors (rather than cardboard) for longer life. Foam rollers are great for use on smooth walls. Otherwise, choose the roller nap (the thickness of the fluffy covering) according to the texture of your wall. Flat smooth walls need a flat smooth roller. Rougher walls need thicker rollers so paint will get down into all the crevices.

Latex Paint > Experts agree that latext paints are friendlier to the environment than oil paints. Latex gives you a faster drying time and requires only water cleanup. Use synthetic bristle brushes (not natural bristle) with latex paints.

Oil Paint > Die hard traditionalists still like oil paints. Use natural bristle brushes for oil paints and get advice at the paint store on cleaning brushes and rollers.

Keep Paint Covered > Exposure to air causes latex paint to skim over, so it’s best to keep the can of paint covered whenever possible. Pour small amounts of paint into a roller tray or small cardboard paint buckets and work from those.

Drop Cloths > Newspaper won’t give your floors enough protection. Plastic sheeting can be slippery. A good environmentally-friendly choice are large heavy canvas drop cloths available at paint stores or home centers. These can be folded to fit most any size room, are not slippery, and can be reused endlessly. Tape down the edges so spills won’t get under the cloth. If you have hardwood floors be sure to vacuum them before putting a drop cloth down.

Tinted Primer > When you purchase paint ask to have cans of primer tinted to match your wall color. Lighter colors can be matched fairly well, though primers won’t take enough pigment to match deeper wall colors. Using tinted primer can often save painting an extra finish coat. Some ceiling white paint is being marketed that is tinted blue when wet, drying to white, which may offer better control and coverage during painting.

Blue Tape > Painter’s blue tape is available in several widths. It is strong yet won’t pull up existing paint in most cases. The tape has a slightly waxy coating that helps seal out paint from seeping underneath. Simply “zip” down a length of tape with the back of a spoon or a knife blade in order to activate the seal. Test this on your surface first with the paint you’ll be using to see how well it works. The seal will only be effective on smooth surfaces. Also, use a minimum of paint near the tape to reduce the chances of seep-through. Remove blue tape when no longer needed, and leave it up only couple of days at the most.

Painting Tips for Homeowners

Comparing Oil and Latex Paints

Durability-Good adhesion is probably the single most important property of paints, because it helps prevent blistering , flaking and cracking.

Latex- Top quality latex paints that contain top quality acrylic binders provide maximum adhesion to most surfaces. Latex paints are also very flexible, so they continue to adhere even when temperature changes cause the surface to expand and contract. This elasticity helps forestall chipping, peeling, flaking and other common paint failures.
? Oil-Alkyd paints also have excellent adhesion, and perform better than latex over heavily chalked surfaces. But with time, the alkyd can embrittle, sometimes resulting in cracking in just a few years.

Color Retention

Latex-Top quality acrylic latex paints provide superior resistance to bleaching and fading,, even when exposed to damaging ultraviolet sun rays.
Oil-Alkyd paints fade faster than latex paints. They are more likely to chalk (develop a powdery substance on their surface), which causes the color to whiten.

Ease of Application

Latex-Latex paints glide smoothly from the brush or roller onto the surface. Top quality latex paints are especially easy to apply, since recently developed additives provide even application and spatter resistance.
Oil-Compared to latex paints, alkyd paints are more difficult to apply,, especially when brushing a large area, because they have more “drag”. On the other hand, they go on heavier and give more complete one-coat hiding and coverage.

Mildew Resistance

Latex-Top quality acrylic latex paints contain mildewcides to discourage mildew and help the paint maintain a fresh appearance.
Oil-Alkyd paints, while also containing mildewcides, are derived from vegetable oils which provide nutrients for mildew growth.

Variety of Uses

Latex-Latex paints can be used on wood, concrete, metal, vinyl siding, aluminum siding, brick and stucco.
Oil-Alkyd paints should not be directly applied to galvanized metal. They also require special chemical pre-treatments before use on new concrete, stucco and other masonry surfaces.

Odor

Latex-Latex paints have little odor and are non-flammable.
Oil-Alkyd paints have noticeably more odor owing to the solvents and oils they contain.

Clean-up

Latex-Latex paints clean up easily with soap and water.
Oil-Alkyd paints require solvents for clean up, making the chore messy and complicated.

Drying Time

Latex-Latex paints dry in just a couple of hours, so you can recoat quickly. However they are vulnerable in case of sudden rain.
Oil-Drying time for alkyd paints can take up to two days- plenty of time for dirt, insects and people to come in contact with the surface and potential to mar it permanently.