Painting Techniques

Have you ever visited a craft show or gift shop, and wondered how the manufacturers get those brand new hand crafted items, to look like antiques? Well, there are many different techniques used for aging new items. Here are just a few that are easy to do, using a variety of different items.

First, we will talk about distressing items. Take a brand new teddy bear for example, his fur is in wonderful shape, no worn spots, his stuffing is firm and in place. But you want this bear to look like a small child has loved him for years. Take a razor or electric clippers and just start trimming that brand new looking little furry creature. Basically around the muzzle and ears, and anywhere he would have been rubbed by little hands, you can also give him a tea dye bath which I will describe later on.

Also for wooden items, such as signs, toys or shelving, break out the sandpaper, hammer and even a screw driver, start taking out your frustrations on the piece of wood in front of you. Beat it, scrape it and sand the edges to make them look worn. Then you can use a medium colored stain to darken the wood and stain the paint. Just put on one light coat and let dry.

You can also add age spots to any items by mixing a bit of black or dark brown paint with a little water, to make it ink-like in consistency. Just dab this on lightly with a paint brush; anywhere you feel a little age spot would be appropriate.

Have you ever seen a sign that looks like the wood had been kept in a work shop? This method is called spattering. After you have painted your project, take an old toothbrush, it is helpful to trim the bristles to between 1/4 and ½ inches long. Dip your toothbrush in water, and now in a spot of paint, color doesn’t matter, but you will need it to contrast with the background color of the painted item. It is also best to place your object on newspaper or in a cardboard box, to keep from spattering your paint everywhere. Now, with the toothbrush facing the project, run your thumb down the bristles of the toothbrush, and spatter the paint onto the surface of your project. You can also spatter with more than one color. Just rinse your toothbrush out, and after the first spattering is dried, re-spatter. Items can also be distressed after this procedure.

Old fabrics generally are stained also, and staining your fabric is very easy to do, with tea. Choose a large container that will hold your project. Fill the container halfway with boiling water and then add about 8 regular tea bags to the water, I usually add some vanilla extract and cinnamon with this too. Wait for the water to cool so that your project will not shrink. Now just toss in your project and allow soaking. Some people recommend removing the tea bags, but I like leaving them in the water, since they will touch the project and make a darker stain in some spots. You can leave this soak for several hours or overnight. Remove, and set out to dry. You can actually even set the item on the edge of the bowl face down and let all of the excess tea run into the face, which will leave interesting looking marks.

If you want to add a few more spots to your item, take a wet tea bag and just tap it on your project. If you are tea dying fabric to use for a project, it can be tossed in the dryer, and then pressed before cutting out your items. This process can be done with any fabric items, such as doll clothes, doll bodies and teddy bears.

There are several aging products on the market one is called “Age it” and another “Crackle it”. This is just painted on a surface after a base coat is painted. If you are going to paint a surface that will be white or another light color when finished, start with a dark base coat. Now paint on the product, it will chemically change the first coat of paint so it will react with the last coat.

Lastly, paint on the final color coat. Watch the chemical reaction taking place, the paint will crack and bubble, giving your project an aging paint looks Very similar to old weathered wood.

These are just a few of the techniques that I use to “age” my craft projects to make them look older than they really are.

Painting Safety Tips

Before tackling how-to painting projects, it is crucial to “brush up” on safety tips. Since painting is the most popular D-I-Y project, please read on to learn how to paint your home safely.

General Tips

You’ve heard it before, but please read the label on the paint can and follow manufacturer’s instructions. If the paint is flammable or combustible, take these precautions:

• Open windows and doors to create ventilation and disperse fumes.
• Eliminate all sources of flame, sparks and ignition (put out pilot lights by turning off the gas and do not re-• • • light until after room is free of fumes).
• While working with flammable or combustible paints, don’t smoke.
• Don’t use electrical equipment while working with paints (it may cause sparks)
• Make sure light bulbs are not exposed to sudden breakage.
• Clean up spills promptly.
• Keep containers closed when not in use.

Outfitting Yourself for Painting

• Wear long sleeve shirt and long pants when painting.
• Wear butyl rubber gloves. This will protect skin and make cleanup easier.
• Wear chemical splash goggles and paint respirator.

Health Precautions

• If paint is swallowed, follow the first-aid directions on the label and contact doctor or poison center immediately.
• While painting, if you feel dizzy or nauseous, leave work area and get fresh air. If discomfort persists, seek medical help.
• If solvent paint gets on your skin, wash immediately with soap and water.
• If solvent paint gets in your eyes, flush eyes with cold water for 15 minutes and obtain medical treatment.

Storing Paint Properly

• Follow label instructions for storing.
• Before storing, make sure containers are tightly sealed.
• Do not store near heat sources such as furnaces and space heaters.
• If you have a very small amount of solvent left, dispose of it properly; don’t store it.
• Keep paint products out of reach of children.
• Do not store or re-use empty containers.

Painting Preparation Tips

Preparation is a necessity in whatever things you are intended to do. In painting, preparation is a must. You can’t just roll the paint or brush paint to your walls, ceilings or anything, it will only turn out ugly instead of making it beautiful. Surely, it will not only waste your things, but you will also waste your time and effort.

In painting, the number 1 reason for its failure is poor preparation. Here are some useful painting preparation tips that will surely help you.

Plan out well what is your color scheme before even buying paint. Think twice before choosing the color you want. Match it to your other décor and consider well what well be its effect to your other things. Be sure also that you have all the things and materials needed before starting so you won’t have to go back and fort to the store to buy it.

Next, prepare the surface of what you are going to paint. Whether you are painting an iron chair, staining a wood end table, walls, ceilings or anything, preparing the surface is absolutely important. If the paint doesn’t have a clean, smooth surface to adhere to, it won’t last long and definitely it won’t look good. Like in walls, it should be sanded, spackled and cleaned, for paint to adhere properly.

If you are painting a room, prepare it too. Remove all your furniture before you begin. If you can’t remove some of your things, use a newspaper or a drop cloth to cover it and floor. Undoubtedly, you don’t want paints splattering over it. Remove also outlet covers, light fixtures, door knobs, electrical switches and other hardware and so if won’t bother your painting.

If the surface is shiny or high-gloss, clean it also and have it sanded in order for the paint to bond. If you are painting a wall, scrape off the wallpapers and flaking paints. Painting over wallpaper will not look good. But if you still want to paint over it, be sure that the paper is tight and does not contain any bleeding colors. You can also apply primer if necessary. If the surface has been painted before, you only need to repaint the patched or repaired areas.

Tape off also the window frames, baseboards or any areas that you don’t want to be painted. This will avoid paint drips and smudges to these areas.

Look also for cracks in the surface. Fill them with patching plasters, filler, wood putty or other suitable compound, whichever is appropriate. When the patch is dry, sand it lightly so that they will level to the surface. Fill nail holes with spackling compound and sand it lightly. To inspect the repaired damages and trim work, dig out rot and filling depression with wood filler.

If you’re painting a metal, sand the entire object so that the rust will be removed and any rough areas are leveled with the rest of the object. It will look better after it is painted if it has a smooth surface. Wash also the surface with good detergent to get rid of the grease, dust and dirt, then rinse it with clean water and let it dry completely.

Following these tips will result to a beautiful and flawless painting. This will definitely save your energy, time and money. Now you are ready to paint.

Painting like a pro

Ready to paint the interior of your home but have no clue as to what kind of preparation, paint or tools you need to do a quality job? Let’s shed a little light on the subject to help you achieve the attractive, long-lasting results you might expect could come only from a professional.

Let me begin by stressing the importance of good preparation. Resist the temptation to take short cuts in this step of a painting project to save time or effort, because proper prep work can make the difference between a good job and a great job and help prevent any paint failures.

When painting spread professional-quality canvas drop cloths to cover and protect the floor. Spilled paint doesn’t soak through canvas as it does a bed sheet or other lightweight cloth, and canvas is safer to walk on. Working on a plastic drop cloth can be like painting on roller skates.

1. First, you need to take down window coverings, and remove the switch-plates and hardware from doors (and cabinets, if you’ll be painting them).

2. Move all the furniture to the middle of the room and cover it with plastic.

3. Enamel paint on trim needs to be dulled using either sandpaper (be sure to wear a dust mask) or a liquid deglosser (be sure to follow directions on the label). I prefer sandpaper because it enables you to sand out old brush marks and roughness.

4. If there is oil-based enamel on the trim or cabinets, you’ll need to apply a prime coat. I prefer a slower drying oil based primer with good hiding ability (you’ll need paint thinner to clean up).

5. Next, fill cracks with a paintable latex caulk, fill nicks and dings with spackle or bond and spot prime these areas. Wall prep usually isn’t as time consuming.

6. Clean any grease, wax or dirt with Tri Sodium Phosphate (TSP) or another degreaser, then rinse.

7. Walls which were previously painted with oil-based enamel (most likely in older kitchens, bathrooms or laundry rooms) should be primed with an oil based primer.

8. Smoke stains should be primed with a stain blocking primer.

9. Fill nail holes with spackle, applied with your fingertip instead of a knife so you don’t fill in any wall texture. I will assume you will be painting with a brush and roller, and not need to do a lot of masking, as is the case when applying paint with a sprayer.

10. Cover baseboards with two inch masking tape.

11. Now that you’ve got your home all prepped and ready to put some fresh color on your walls, you need to pick up the paint and tools required to do a quality job. With all the paint manufacturers and dealers out there offering so many different grades of products, it’s no wonder many consumers have no idea which products to buy. Don’t buy the cheapest stuff you can get your hands on because it probably won’t give you the coverage or durability you need. But you don’t necessarily need the most expensive, either. Knowing what you’re looking for will make it much easier.

Finishes and Gloss

The vast majority of finishes used today are water-based latex. Oil based paints are rarely used for finishes anymore because the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has put a limit on the amount of volatile chemicals that can be used.

The first thing to understand is that paints have different gloss ratings (or sheens), from flat to lo-sheen, eggshell, semi-gloss and finally, gloss. Flat has little or no sheen and is used primarily for walls and ceilings. The remaining is considered enamels and can range from a five to 85 percent sheen rating – the higher the rating, the higher the shine. These are used for trim, cabinets and walls in kitchens, bathrooms and laundry rooms. Many homeowners use enamels on all their walls because they are more durable and easier to clean, but I recommend lo-sheen because it is more attractive than shinier enamels.

How Much Paint to Buy?

You’ll need to measure the square footage of your walls and ceilings. Most paints will cover from 300 to 400 square feet per gallon. Double that, because I recommend applying two coats on all surfaces to insure good coverage and maximum durability.

Tools

1. At least one good two and one-half- to three-inch paint brush (Purdy is a good brand and if you keep it clean it should last forever)

2. A nine-inch roller frame

3. A nine-inch screen

4. A nine-inch roller covers with a one-half to one-inch nap “lamb’s wool is best”

5. A two-gallon bucket

6. A five-gallon bucket

7. A four-to eight-foot rolling pole (which could double as a handle for a broom or other implement) to save time and your back

8. You might also consider foam brushes and rollers (for a smoother finish on trim and cabinets)

Make just one final appraisal of your prep work to make sure it is complete. (Remember, no short cuts!) Read the labels on the paint cans for any special instructions and familiarize yourself with what you are using. Now you should be ready to go!

1. Put your nine-inch screen in your five-gallon bucket (eliminating any need for a roller tray) and pour three to four gallons of paint in the bucket.

2. Attach your rolling pole to the roller frame, slide on the roller cover and dunk it into the bucket.

3. Roll only three feet at a time to spread the paint evenly over the wall, using the roller to get as close to the corners as possible.

4. After rolling, pour some paint into the two-gallon bucket, dip your new brush and start “cutting in” around the trim and corners.

5. Make sure the paint is completely dry before applying the second coat.

Trim

For trim, make sure the surface is clean before painting, some enamels brush better than others, so ask the paint store which product has the best brush ability and is user friendly. A product called Floe-tol can also be added to enamels to help them flow better and eliminate brush marks, or you can add a few splashes of water (just don’t overdo it). You can also try the foam brush or roller, experimenting to see what is most comfortable and effective for you.

Painting Laminated Plastic Countertops

One of the main concerns with using melamine paint on your countertops is the curing period between coats. The following is the proper method to paint counters.

1. Wash the entire area using TSP (tri sodium phosphate) and a Scotch Brite type abrasive scrub pad.

2. Rinse well with clear water.

3. Allow it to dry.

4. Mask all areas to be protected such as sinks, faucets, the backsplash, etc.

5. Roll on first coat using a Wizz roller (foam type) and allow it to cure for a full 24 hours.

6. Roll on a second coat and allow another full 24 hours.

7. Never place hot pots/plates or do any cutting on the painted surface.

Note: Always remember this is still paint, so use your countertop with TLC.

Selling Your Mississauga Home? Learn the Paint Colors You Should Use

When someone is thinking of buying your home, they have to be able to envision themselves (and their furniture) in the space. Your home will have a better chance of selling if you get YOU out of the way. That means painting over your kitchen walls with something a bit more universal. Find out what you should be thinking of when painting your home for resale.

Interior
Think neutral inside. Colors that are specific to certain styles or tastes will not have a universal appeal, and your home will likely sit on the market for a long time if you veer from neutral. Remember: you want your home to be a blank canvas for potential home buyers to picture themselves there.

When you hear neutral, you might think beige. And beige colors are, indeed, neutral. But they aren’t always the best color for your home because people are leaning more towards cool colors lately. Instead, gray does a great job of highlighting the beautiful features of your home, opening up the space and making it feel appealing.

Taupe works well in the interior, too, because you can add different undertones to add to its richness.

White is always a safe neutral, but make sure you don’t go too stark. Choose a white with cool undertones, avoiding yellow undertones, to make the space modern and welcoming.

Exterior
A home with signs of wear on the exterior isn’t going to sell as quickly or for as much as you’d hope. Remember that the exterior gives a preview to what someone will be met with on the interior. Your potential home buyers will make a judgment on your home before they even step inside, and that will color their feelings about what they find on the interior.

Look to the rest of the neighborhood when choosing your paint color. You want your home to stand out as a desirable home, but you don’t want it to stand out because it’s so different from everything around it.

White goes with all neighborhoods. Greige is a beautiful neutral that suits most houses. Gray and blue (in the right shade) can also look stunning, yet neutral for any home buyer, on an exterior.

How to Make the Most of Your Paint
No matter what paint palette you choose, you need to apply it properly if it’s going to make the right impression.

Always choose quality paint. It will cost more, but its coverage will be more thorough and you won’t need as many coats. Plus, it will look beautiful and professional.
Use samples instead of paint chips. Paint chips give you a good start, but they aren’t big enough to give you the best effect, and the paint may end up looking slightly different once on the wall. Testing by painting samples directly on the wall will help you be sure you’re making the right decision.
Use professional techniques. Your potential home buyers are going to be turned off by shoddy work. Drips, uneven coverage, and mistakes look like your home is uncared for. If you’re a painting novice, it might be worth it to invest in a professional paint company who will leave your home looking move-in ready.
Mississauga Painters can help you select the right color palette for your house style and neighborhood, and leave your home looking beautiful and professionally handled. Give us a call at (289) 499-4491, or contact us online for an estimate.

Source: https://mississauga-painters.ca/

Torn Wallpaper

If you have torn or ragged wallpaper that looks beyond repair, don’t worry, because if you have some extra paper, you could easily fix it by matching up the pattern.

1. Cut a section of wallpaper making sure that the piece you’ve chosen matches the pattern of the section on the wall that needs repair. Carefully align the pattern.

2. Tack it to the wall with some painters tape.

3. Use a straight edge and utility knife to cut through both the new wallpaper and the damaged paper underneath. Set the patch in a safe spot .

4. Use a sponge dipped in hot water to dampen the damaged section. The water should easily loosen the adhesive so you can peel away all the problem area. Rinse the sponge and clean the wall. Then allow it to dry completely.

5. mmediately, place it on the wall. It should fit perfectly into your area.

Stripping Hardware

You painted and skipped the prep work but now you have painted hardware. Well, I can show you how to fix it.

1. If there are just a few splotches, hold a cloth dipped in warm vinegar over the paint and then use a plastic putty knife to scrape away the drips.

2. If that just isn’t going to cut it, carefully remove the hardware from the doors and windows.

3. Lay some foil on your work surface to protect it from chemicals, and pull on a pair of chemical resistant gloves.

4. Work in a well ventilated area. Fill a coffee can about halfway with paint stripper. Then, drop your hardware in the liquid. If you’d like to be able to fish the hardware out just tie a piece of string to the hardware then dip it into the liquid. Be careful not to splash.

5. Let it sit for the amount of time recommended on the package and then carefully pull it out.

6. Scrape away any big drips left on and rinse the hardware well.The good thing about this method is that you can re-use the stripper until your project is completely done.