Patching Wallpaper and Removing Bubbles

Most bubbles you see in wallpaper are just air pockets. But sometimes, a bit of debris causes the pocket. In order to tell the difference, press on the area and see if you feel anything. If you do, cut a small X on the wallpaper with a utility knife, remove the debris, apply a little adhesive to the back of the wallpaper, and press it back against the wall. Smooth out any ripples.

If the bubble is an air pocket, simply slice the wallpaper carefully. If the wallpaper has a pattern, try to cut along the pattern to conceal your work. Apply adhesive to the back of the wallpaper and gently push it back onto wall. Remove any excess adhesive and use your hands to smooth out the paper.

How to patch wallpaper:

1. Find a remnant of wallpaper that matches the piece that needs to be replaced. Cut a section that is slightly larger than the damaged area. Apply it to the wall over the damaged area with removable tape. Make sure the pattern lines up.

2. Take your utility knife and cut through both the wall paper patch and the wallpaper that is on the wall. This will ensure that you have a replacement piece the exact same size as your opening.

3. Remove your patch and wet the damaged area. Gently peel the damaged piece away, being careful not to dam age the surrounding areas. Scrape away any excess glue or wallpaper in the area. You may need to use a hot, wet washcloth to ease the glue off the wall. Make sure the wall is clean and dry before you continue.

4. Apply adhesive to the back of the patch and carefully place it in the clean, dry area. Make sure the pattern matches up.

5. Smooth out the patch with your hand or a ruler, making sure there are no bubbles.

6. Wipe away any adhesive that might have oozed out with a damp washcloth. Let dry.

How to Patching Peeling Paint

When old paint chips, flakes, or peels, it leaves behind a shallow depression. You’ll need to repair these spots before painting – new coats of paint won’t hide them. Use a fast-drying patching compound to fill the hole.

1. Scrape away any loose paint with a putty knife or paint scraper. Apply the spackling compound to the edges of the chipped paint with a putty knife or flexible wallboard knife.

 

 

 

2. Sand the patched areas with 150-grit production sandpaper. The patched places should feel smooth to the touch and not have any edges. If the walls have a textured surface you’ll need to texture the patched areas to match.

Painting over Wallpaper

You don’t necessarily have to remove your old wallpaper to paint your walls a different color.

Removing wallpaper-especially if it’s been on the walls for years-can cause unexpected damage to your walls. But if it’s in good condition and has no signs of adhesion failure, there’s no reason to invest a lot of time and effort in removing it before painting your walls.

Also, by leaving the wallpaper in place, your walls will stay in their current condition, and you’ll be able to start painting without delay.

Prep before Painting

It’s vital to prepare your walls carefully before painting. Follow these simple steps to ensure the best results:

• Start by replacing any damaged sections and adding adhesive to loose pieces to minimize the chance the paper will fall.
• Add a thin line of clear caulk around the perimeter of the walls, at the joint seam where the paper meets the floor and ceiling. This will help seal the edges and keep the paper from peeling after you’ve painted.
• Cover heavily textured paper with a thin coat of joint compound (spackle). This material will help smooth out the surface so that the texture won’t show through the paint.
• Gently sand down the seams of the wallpaper so they’re not too noticeable.
• Apply a coat of oil-based primer to the entire surface of the walls before painting. This helps seal the adhesive within the paper and away from the moisture in the paint.
• The wallpaper is now ready for painting. Because the moisture in latex paint can sometimes loosen wallpaper glue, causing bubbles or peeling, you should use oil-based paint.
Finally, it’s time to enjoy your freshly painted room.

Painting Interiors

PREPARING INTERIORS

The key to a successful, good-looking paint job is preparation. As with anything in life, when you are more prepared, you tend to be more efficient and to look better! Painting is no exception. Preparation usually takes longer than the actual painting and is thus tempting to skip, but trust me. The time you take to properly prepare at the beginning of the job will save you lots of headaches and money in the long run.
If your interior walls have been well maintained, and you are simply going to freshen them up or change the color, then prep time can be kept to a minimum, and may even be as simple as washing the walls.
If the walls are in bad shape, however, be prepared for some serious effort. I once spent two weeks preparing a single bathroom in an old rental apartment; not only were there layers and layers of cheap paint from years of quick-fix property-manager jobs, but the paint was covering wall paper from the 1950s. By the time I got to the paper, I felt like I was on an archaeological dig! Apart from the walls, the studio apartment had old ornate plaster ceilings—beautiful, but a nightmare to scrape backs all the flaky, hanging paint.

How to prepare interiors:

1. Remove all furniture and rugs, or move these items to the middle of the room and cover them with a sheet.

2. Remove all pictures, shelves, hooks, curtain rods, brackets, and any other moveable items from the walls. Be sure to keep all screws, nails, etc., with the item so they do not get lost.

3. Remove cover plates from electrical outlets and switches. Be sure to keep all screws with their plates.

4. Protect any other item in room with either a drop cloth or tape. You can use the blue painter’s tape for base boards, corners, windowsills, or any area that you would like to mask off.

5. Fix the walls by repairing any small holes. Fill these with joint compound or putty with a small putty knife. Once it’s dry, sand it until smooth with 100-grit sand paper. Seal these spots with primer.

6. Wash down all walls with a sponge or wet rag.

TIP: Tape screws to the objects you remove so that the hardware stays with the objects.


PRIMING INDOOR SURFACES

You should prime most surfaces that you intend to paint. If you are covering an old paint job, and the color is not too dark, you can get away with not priming. Priming is just as it sounds—it “primes” or prepares the wall for paint. You should definitely prime any wall surface that you have just re paired and unfinished wood that you intend to paint.
How do you prime? Priming is just painting, so follow the directions in the next page2. Instead of paint, use primer!


PAINTING WITH A PAINTBRUSH

Let the painting begin! Now that your room is prepared, you are ready to start painting. The best way to paint is from top to bottom, mainly because if paint should drip down the wall, you can easily smooth the surface and retouch. Start at the top near the ceiling with a two paintbrush. This is where you do the “cutting in” described earlier. Use this brush to paint the corners and edges, including near the baseboard, doors, and window trim. You can then fill in the rest of the surface with a paint roller.

How to paint with a paintbrush:

1. Dip the paintbrush into the paint.

2. Pull the paintbrush along the side of the container to remove any excess paint and avoid drips.

3. Use long, even strokes to spread the paint on the painting surface. Make sure that you do not have any drips or buildup.

4. Keep using the brush until the strokes become dry.

5. Redid the brush into the paint and continue.

TIP: Take a large nail with a very sharp point and make five or six tiny holes all along the rim of the paint can. This allows the paint to drain back into the can when you brush off excess, instead of it spilling over the sides.

PAINTING WITH A ROLLER

For a large surface, rolling is the best way to achieve fast and efficient results with ample coverage. When purchasing a roller sleeve (or cover), don’t skimp. Spend the money and get a higher quality sleeve. It will pay off in the long run. Use rolling to fill in the central part of the surface after you has done the cutting in on the corners and edges with a paint brush.

How to paint with a roller:

TIP: There are a couple of different ways to apply paint to your roller. The first is by using a paint tray as explained above. Another is to hang a paint grate or bucket screen over a five-gallon bucket of paint. You can dip the roller into the paint, run it along the grate, and get a nice, even distribution of paint over the roller, if you do this, add to your Tuft Tools list a large bucket and bucket screen.

1. Remove any excess lint from the roller sleeve

2. If you are using water-based latex paint, run the sleeve under water. This opens up the fibers and allows paint to penetrate. Use mineral spirits if you are using oil- based paints.

3. Squeeze any excess liquid from the roller

4. Fill the paint tray—not too deep—with paint.

5. To properly put paint on the roller, dip it into the paint then use the textured ramp of the paint tray to roll the roller back and forth and evenly distribute the paint. Your roller should be covered with just enough paint, but not so much that it is dripping or running.

6. On the surface, make an upward roll. Continue rolling both up and down in about 4-foot sections, at a slight diagonal. Be careful not to go so fast that you splatter paint.

7. Use the roller until the strokes become dry.

8. Then redip the roller in the paint and continue.

TIP: Use a large plastic bag to cover an entire paint tray. Pour the paint into the tray, over the plastic bag. That way, when you are complete you just turn the bag Inside out and throw the mess away.

Painting Wood Floors

Painting wood floors is a great way to offer a new look and often times a new life to the woods within your home. For many, it is an excellent way to discover a new and beautiful flooring option for the home. But, where do you begin? While many people first think to call the professional in for this job, you really can do it on your own. With a few skills and a few helpful tips, you can discover a new world under your feet. Here are some things that you can consider first of all.

Painting wood floors is not a small job. Not all wood flooring can or should be painted either. Many times, hardwood floors and laminates will have protective coatings on them to protect them and to give them more durability. But, these coatings will get in the way of your painting. If you have a wood flooring that has a coating like this, you may need to seek the manufacturers advice on how to handle the painting.

Still other wood flooring is troublesome because it has been stained. While many times you can paint over stain, you need to take protective and careful measures to insure that you do not damage the wood in your painting process.

Once you have found out just what your painting entails, you can get started with the task at hand. In most cases, a properly clean and repaired floor is necessary to start with. In these cases, you will find that you will need to prime the wood prior to getting started with painting. You will also need to adjust your type of paint to match the type of wood as well as any protective coating and stain that is on that wood. All in all, painting wood is quite doable, if you take the right measures to get it done correctly.

Painting Tips for Interior Painting

Foam Rollers > Foam rollers can really assist in getting a beautiful smooth wall finish. They are easy to use and spatter very little. Try them for your next paint job! (They won’t work on heavily textured or rough surfaces however.) Foam brushes on the other hand are mainly useful only for small paint jobs since they may not stand up to doing an entire room.

Pad Painters > Smooth pad painters are extremely useful and offer neat application and simple cleanup.

Just make sure you only ‘float’ the pad on top of the paint to load it, since once the pad is submerged into the paint it can become a drippy mess and you’ll need to take it apart, clean it, and start over.

Rollers > Look for rollers with plastic interiors (rather than cardboard) for longer life. Foam rollers are great for use on smooth walls. Otherwise, choose the roller nap (the thickness of the fluffy covering) according to the texture of your wall. Flat smooth walls need a flat smooth roller. Rougher walls need thicker rollers so paint will get down into all the crevices.

Latex Paint > Experts agree that latext paints are friendlier to the environment than oil paints. Latex gives you a faster drying time and requires only water cleanup. Use synthetic bristle brushes (not natural bristle) with latex paints.

Oil Paint > Die hard traditionalists still like oil paints. Use natural bristle brushes for oil paints and get advice at the paint store on cleaning brushes and rollers.

Keep Paint Covered > Exposure to air causes latex paint to skim over, so it’s best to keep the can of paint covered whenever possible. Pour small amounts of paint into a roller tray or small cardboard paint buckets and work from those.

Drop Cloths > Newspaper won’t give your floors enough protection. Plastic sheeting can be slippery. A good environmentally-friendly choice are large heavy canvas drop cloths available at paint stores or home centers. These can be folded to fit most any size room, are not slippery, and can be reused endlessly. Tape down the edges so spills won’t get under the cloth. If you have hardwood floors be sure to vacuum them before putting a drop cloth down.

Tinted Primer > When you purchase paint ask to have cans of primer tinted to match your wall color. Lighter colors can be matched fairly well, though primers won’t take enough pigment to match deeper wall colors. Using tinted primer can often save painting an extra finish coat. Some ceiling white paint is being marketed that is tinted blue when wet, drying to white, which may offer better control and coverage during painting.

Blue Tape > Painter’s blue tape is available in several widths. It is strong yet won’t pull up existing paint in most cases. The tape has a slightly waxy coating that helps seal out paint from seeping underneath. Simply “zip” down a length of tape with the back of a spoon or a knife blade in order to activate the seal. Test this on your surface first with the paint you’ll be using to see how well it works. The seal will only be effective on smooth surfaces. Also, use a minimum of paint near the tape to reduce the chances of seep-through. Remove blue tape when no longer needed, and leave it up only couple of days at the most.

Painting Ideas For Interior Walls

Many people want to make their home to look a little classier and more comfortable to live in. This is why many Americans today spend a lot of money on interior decorations and on comfortable chairs, such as recliners and extra soft mattresses. However, what many people don’t know is that comfort and coziness also depends on the walls itself.

Try to imagine living in a home with all walls painted in black or with walls with no paint at all. It will seem dull and unwelcoming. You have to consider that the coziness and the warmth in homes will also depend on the wall paint. With the right mixture of colors, you will see that your home will even be more inviting and cozier to live in than ever before.

Firstly, painting interior walls isn’t just about arming yourself with a roller and the paint you like. It is also important to know that there are painting methods and techniques that you can use in interior wall painting to make your home more welcoming to look at. The proper painting techniques will also enhance the lighting and the look of your furniture too.

So, here are some of the techniques that you can use when you are painting your home’s interior walls:

Firstly, you have to choose the proper color for every room of your home. In the kitchen, you should consider choosing a color that will match the finish of your cabinets and the table. It is important that you should also choose a bright color for the kitchen. It will improve your mood and it will also keep you smiling as you prepare you and your family’s meals.

You should also choose a different color scheme for every room of your home in order for people to distinguish which room is which. Using different color schemes in every room will also make your home unique and better to look at. Besides, a home with a single color scheme, no matter how bright or happy the color scheme is, it will still be very dull to have a single color scheme.

In the bathroom, you can consider choosing a clean looking color, such as blue or green. These colors can give the bathroom a look of more space and a clean feeling. For bedrooms, you can use sleep inducing colors, such as light blue.

Sponging is also a great technique you can use in painting to enhance the color scheme. For example, if you used the color blue in a room as a base color, you can consider letting it dry thoroughly and use a lighter shade of blue for the sponging technique. You will see that the effect will be quite attractive. Although sponging can take a long time, the effect it offers is worth the effort.

Another interior wall painting technique is by making your walls look like they are made of suede or plaster. With this technique, you will see that it will make the room stand out. It may seem difficult to do, but it only requires a few easy steps to get the desired effect.

Now that you know how to paint your interior walls and what proper colors to choose, it will definitely make your home stand out from the rest. So, stop living in a dull home by repainting your interior walls to make your home look a lot cozier and more welcoming than before.

Painting Ideas For A Girl’s Room

Green and pink are probably the two hottest paint colors for every girl’s room these days. These interior paint colors create a fresher look for your girl’s room.

If you want a punchy pair of paint color, then go with green and pink. This is a surefire color trend nowadays. Every girl wants their room to be unique and expressive, and this might be the right time to start painting their room.

Having second thoughts? Well, with the help of these painting ideas for a girl’s room, you will encounter less or even no problems at all.

1. If you want to make a girl’s room warmer, paint the walls with pink. But if you want to the room to be cooler, the walls should be painted with green.

2. Achieve balance between these two colors by using two thirds of the pink and one third of the green, or the other way around.

3. If you want to get greater interest, mix the shades of green and pink.

4. The intensity of the paint colors can also affect the room’s dramatic effect by keeping the colors far from each other or close enough.

5. Paint the room with flower power. Use semi-gloss paint using the shades of pink. Don’t forget to apply a base coat first and leave it to dry. Afterwards you can apply the pink colored paint on top. By using flower stamps, press it on the wall firmly. The flower stamps should be at least five to eight inches apart.

6. If your girl wants her room decorated with stripes, then you can paint the room in stripes. Use satin paints with the shades of green. A base coat should be applied and wait until it dries. Use a roller (marble-look cover) to paint the walls so that mottled surfaces are created. Start behind the room’s door and measure/mark the stripes. You can freely decide how the stripes are spaced. Use a liner brush to paint the stripes. Start painting the stripe from the top to the bottom.

7. You can also create a psychedelic swirl by combining a dark pink paint color over a base coat of light pink. The pattern that can be obtained from this kind of project is fresh and does not overwhelm space. After the base coat dries, use the crafts knife to cut the small notches that measures about three millimeters. After doing this, use a neutral glazing medium and apply the mixture to the room’s wall with the use of roller covered in foam. While it’s wet, comb the curved strokes using a squeegee. The swirled design can be achieved by combing the strokes in two different directions. Then after the whole wall is done, leave it to dry.

8. A polka dot design is also great for a girl’s room. You can use different shades of green for this project. You will need a stamp graphic pattern to add a lively tone to the plain wash wall. If your girl’s room has too much sunlight coming in, use the paint with celery-green shade. Use semi-gloss paints for this project and for the polka dots, use white-colored paint. Glaze is applied after the base coat dries in round motion. After the glaze dries, you can now stamp the polka dots on the wall.

Your girl will love spending lots of her time inside her room after the painting is done nicely.

Painting Ideas For A Boy’s Bedroom

Teens are very much different from the regular little kids in school. Their tastes greatly vary and so when you decide to paint your teen boy’s bedroom, you should have extraordinary painting ideas just to capture their attention.

The internet offers a wide array of painting ideas that you can see for yourself. These great painting ideas can help you a lot especially if you don’t know where to start. Not all people are artistic enough but admit it, anyone can paint; and so can you.
Don’t delay this very simple task and start painting your teen’s bedroom. To aid you in your special painting project, don’t forget these cool painting ideas specially conceptualized for your teen boy’s bedroom.

1. Vibrant colors attract teenagers easily. You can paint your boy’s bedroom with blue or purple shades. The painting on the walls cannot stand alone so you would also need to provide accents like lighter shades of furniture.

2. Painting your teen’s room with only plain colored paint can sometimes be boring for your boy; so it would be best to have a mural painting on their wall. You can choose a certain theme that your teen boy is interested with and paint it on the wall. Since he’s already old enough, you can even let him join in the painting process. You will surely have a good time.

2. For your painting mural, you can have a motor sports theme, surf theme, and any other appropriate theme that your boy likes.

4. Do a solid color theme for your boy’s room. Aside from the solid color, you can also use other colors, however, be sure to use them in little amounts. If you follow this tip, your boy’s room can have an excellent overall design.

5. If your teenager is interested in cowboys, you can paint his room with any warm red shade. All other room accessories should coordinate with the cowboys theme.

6. If your boy loves race cars, you can paint racing stripes or even checkered flags on the windows and walls of the bedroom.

7. Chalkboard paints are still recommended for a teen boy’s room especially if your teen is an artist by nature. He can express himself freely inside his bedroom because the entire wall will serve as his chalkboard.

8. If your teen likes to stick things on the wall, then you’d better prepare your pockets for the expensive magnetic paint. By applying several coats of magnetic paint, the walls of the bedroom can hold anything that’s magnetic.

9. As mentioned a bit earlier, the theme can also be about sports like basketball, swimming, football, and any other sport that your boy loves playing. All you have to do is to choose the best paint color that will suit the theme. After choosing the paint’s color, you can choose the room’s accessories that will complement the color of the bedroom wall.

10. Get your boy involved in the work. He knows what he likes so let him do the choosing. Your task is just to guide him and help him. During one weekend, the family can all help together to paint the bedroom. Family bonding is one way to bring the family closer together.

Your search for the best painting ideas for your boy’s bedroom is over. Now, you can have a lot of choices. Make a good decision for your boy’s room.

Painting Ceiling and Walls

PainterClick.com Offer tips for paint ceiling and walls as efficiently as possible without making a mess.

Surface Preparation
The first thing I do when painting a room spread professional-quality canvas drop cloths to cover and protect the floor. Spilled paint doesn’t soak through canvas as it does a bed sheet or other lightweight cloth, and canvas is safer to walk on. Working on a plastic drop cloth can be like painting on roller skates.
The plaster walls in the room needed some fairly extensive patching work. In this type of situation, I start by fixing all the questionable areas, taking care not to create a lot of dust that might get into fresh paint. Next,
I caulk all gaps between the trim (baseboard, window and door casing) and the walls with a high-quality paintable caulk. I smooth the caulk with a damp rag. Caulking always makes the finished paint job look better.
I also make sure that the room I’m painting has adequate lighting. Even if there is a lot of natural light,
I always have halogen work lights and clip-on parabolic lights handy.
The next step is prepping and priming the trim. Painting trim is a different kettle of fish, but I make sure that the trim paint overlaps the wall about 1/8 in. When the trim is primed, I begin work on the walls and ceiling, letting the finish coat on the trim covers any stray paint from the walls.

Priming
The ceiling and walls in the room had water stains from an old roof leak that had been fixed; also, the former owners of the house were heavy smokers, which left the ceiling and walls stained. So I decided to cover everything with a stain blocking primer. “BULLS EYE”.
The two steps to painting a large area are cutting in and rolling. Cutting in is brushing paint onto areas the roller won’t reach.
Painters naturally start at the top and work down; I stand on a ladder and paint everything I won’t be able reach comfortably from the floor. For cutting in, I never work out of the paint can but instead use a cut bucket. You can buy one or make one. I cut in with a 3-in. brush to give me a 3-in. band to roll into. Because the ceiling and walls are being painted with the same primer, I cut in the corners without being too careful, using the flat part of the brush on both sides of the corner.
Where the primer meets the prepped trim, I paint up to the edge of the trim using the narrow side of the brush, overlapping the wall primer onto the trim slightly but not being overly accurate with my line at this point. Overlapping coats at the edges of the trim creates a less stark line between the trim paint and the wall paint. When I’ve finished cutting in the upper parts of the room from the ladder, I work from the floor cutting in the rest.

Rolling equipment
Once the entire room is cut in, it’s on to the rolling. The first thing I need is a roller frame, which is the handle and holder for the roller pad. Roller frames come in an amazing array of widths and shapes, but I usually stick with the standard 9-in. model. I avoid cheap roller frames because they don’t hold up well.
The next-most-important tool for painting ceiling and walls is a telescoping extension pole. These poles come in various sizes, but for most rooms with flat ceilings, a 4-ft. pole that telescopes to 8 ft. or so works great.
I avoid screw-together extension poles; they’re a lot of trouble.
The extension pole has a broom-handle thread on one end that screws into the roller frame. This tool keeps me from running up and down a stepladder to paint ceilings. If I paint a ceiling without an extension pole,
I end up working directly under the roller, getting spattered as I paint.
Next, I need the correct roller pad for the job and paint I’m applying. For smooth surfaces, a roller pad with a short nap (1/4-in. to 1/2 in.) is fine. But if you are covering heavy stucco, you may need as much as a
1-1/2-in. nap. For the oil-based primer that I’m using for the job in the photos, I chose an inexpensive 3/8-in. nap roller pad good for any kind of paint.

Working out of a 5-gal. Pail
The two most common ways to get paint onto the roller are a standard paint pan, which I use for the finish coats, or a 5-gal. Bucket with a roller ramp hung on the rim. For the primer on this project, I needed about
2-1/2 gal. Of paint, so I poured that amount into the pail inserted the roller ramp and got to work.
The 5-gal. Bucket should be no more than half full, leaving most of the ramp exposed. I dip the roller pad slightly into the paint — about one-quarter of the way — and draw it up onto the ramp. Dipping the roller into the paint any deeper can make it drip all over the place.
I dip the pad several times while rolling it up and down the ramp until the pad is completely saturated.
Most ramps are made of expanded metal that distributes the paint evenly on the roller pad while allowing excess paint to drain back into the pail. When the roller pad is fully loaded, I place it near the top of the ramp and give it a quick downward push off the roller ramp to spin off any excess paint.

Ready to roll
I start rolling in one corner of the ceiling, working down the short side of the room first. I roll the paint in 3-ft. squares with each square overlapping the next slightly. (A 3-ft. by 3-ft. area is about what a properly loaded roller ought to cover.) For each square, I roll the paint on from side to side in compacted W or M formations: down straight, back up on a slight diagonal, then straight down again, overlapping each down stroke with the one before. But remember you’re painting, not spelling. Overlapping gives you even coverage and keeps you from missing any spots. Where the squares overlap my cut-in band, I try to keep the roller about 1 in. from the corner.
Once the ceiling is finished, I start on the walls. I first work my way along the top of each wall in similar
3-ft. squares. The small sections above windows and doors are done in shorter, smaller strokes.

Ropes, drips and runs
The biggest concern when rolling paint is that excess paint tends to build up on the outside edges of the roller pad and frame. Paint buildup leaves behind ropes, or heavy lines of paint, in the wake of the roller.
Going back over a section with the roller smoothes out any ropes or areas with too much paint from working with an overloaded pad. But it helps to get rid of the excess paint on the roller that is causing the ropes in the first place. When ropes begin to appear, I tilt the frame and pad slightly at an angle to the wall with just the end touching and roll it for a couple of inches. I repeat the process with the other side of the roller and then work the drips that have squeezed out into the area I’m painting. When I’m finished with a section, the paint should be a consistent thickness over the entire area.

Mix all your cans of finish paint for consistent color
Because I use a fast-drying primer, I can apply the finish coats almost immediately. For the room,
I gave the ceiling one coat of white finish paint, and the walls two coats.
For the finish coat, I roll the ceiling first so that any drips or spatter that I get on the walls will be covered with their finish coat. When cutting in the ceiling, I again overlap the finish paint slightly onto the walls.
It’s still not necessary to be extremely tidy; I just try not to leave any globs of paint on the walls.
Next is the final coat on the walls, and I don’t want to be short on paint. I also want a little paint left over in case I need to touch up or repair a wall in the future. But custom-mixed colors usually vary from can to can, which can be obvious if I have to buy an extra quart to finish a job.
The trick is to overbuy and then mix all the cans of paint together thoroughly before I start. Most paints cover around 400-sq. ft. of flat surface per 3.78 litre.
I’ve seen painters pour half of a gallon can into a container and then pour half of a second can into the first. They continue this process around until all the cans have been blended completely. Mixing paint in this manner is known as boxing, but I find it easier just to pour all the paint into a 5-gal. Bucket.

Be finicky on the final cut in
The time has finally arrived to take the extra effort to cut in neatly. I start at the ceiling line of one wall and cut it in as neatly as possible. It’s still okay if it’s not absolutely perfect; I’ll fine-tune the line on the final coat.
Again, I create the first horizontal line with a high quality 3-in. brush turned on edge. I then complete the band using the full 3-in. width. I also overlap onto the trim slightly, but I don’t go crazy. For the project featured here, the trim was to be white, which wouldn’t cover the teal wall paint well.

A paint pan minimizes ropes
Instead of working out of a 5-gal. Bucket, I use a roller pan for the finish coats on both the ceiling and walls. Loading the roller out of a paint pan gives me better control over ropes and drips. When filling a roller pan, I pour in just enough paint to fill the deep end of the pan. And again, I don’t let the entire roller submerge in the paint. When the roller is saturated, I give it a light twirl to spin off excess paint from the ends.
Roll the walls the same way I did on the primer coat, working in 3-ft. squares and making sure the paint is applied evenly. When the first coat is dry, I go over the walls with light sandpaper using a work light to illuminate lumps or debris that might need to be smoothed out.
Cutting in the second coat gives me the chance to fine-tune the line between the ceiling and walls. Working in an older home, I often find myself having to invent a straight line because the corners are uneven. I take my time and fill in any small gaps left from the first coat.
Don’t use masking tape to create a straight corner line, which can make an even bigger mess than you’re trying to prevent. Instead, take your time and trust yourself with the brush. You can’t do any damage that can’t be easily fixed with either wall or ceiling paint.
The roller pad I used for the first coat still had plenty of life in it after one coat, so I didn’t want to throw it out. But I couldn’t let it sit out overnight either, so I stuck it in the fringe. I just double-wrapped the roller pad {still on the frame} in old plastic grocery bags and set it next to the eggs and milk. Paint dries slowly at refrigerator temperatures. The next day, I let the roller come to room temperature and was ready to roll the next coat.
When I’m finished with the final coat, I use the curved part of a painter’s 5-in-1 tool to scrape most of the residual paint out of the roller, and then I throw the roller pad away.
There are gadgets on the market that are supposed to help with cleaning rollers. But cleaning a roller pad can shorten its limited life span and can even destroy a cheaper pad that has a cardboard core.
Throwing pads away may not be frugal, but besides being a pain, cleaning roller pads is inefficient. Every time I try cleaning a pad, there always seems to be a bit of residual paint that spoils whatever I try to paint next.
To store leftover paint, I secure the lid and store the can upside down. The next time I need it, the tint that settles to the bottom naturally mixes back into the paint.