Painting Wood Furniture

Do you have some dingy, old wood furniture that is just too comfortable to get rid of but might do well with a fresh coat of paint? Many people are painting wood furniture and giving it a new life. It can be quite welcoming to clean and paint this furniture. It doesn’t even have to be a difficult job! So, how can you go about painting wood? Here are some helpful tips on how to do so. You’ll find that it can be very rewarding to transform your home’s furniture into something beautiful and lasting.

No matter what type of wood furniture that you need to paint, you simply must paint it only after you have cleaned and repaired any damages. It is important to look for mildew, mold, or other harmful issues on the wood itself. You also need to consider any peeling or cracking in the wood as well. Lastly, consider the moisture or humidity in the area in which you are using the furniture. Drying out and then controlling the amount of humidity that the wood is exposed to will keep it in good condition.

Depending on what type of wood furniture you have and where it is located will help you to choose the proper paints to use on it. When painting wood furniture, you need to take into consideration if it is exposed to the weather, if it is to be stained or painted, and whether or not the type of wood will hold paint well. You can find various types of paint for just about every type of furniture product. When you take the time to choose the right products to use, you’ll end up with a good finished product.

Don’t skip steps either! Many people simply think that a coat of paint is all that is needed to create a new look with their furniture. Some woods need more care and consideration than others. For example, you’ll find many products need primers and others will require etching products to all for the paint to stick to the surface. When you take the time to find the right materials to use and take your time with painting wood furniture, it comes out beautifully and you can turn even the worst looking chair or table into a remarkable piece.

Painting Wood Floors

Painting wood floors is a great way to offer a new look and often times a new life to the woods within your home. For many, it is an excellent way to discover a new and beautiful flooring option for the home. But, where do you begin? While many people first think to call the professional in for this job, you really can do it on your own. With a few skills and a few helpful tips, you can discover a new world under your feet. Here are some things that you can consider first of all.

Painting wood floors is not a small job. Not all wood flooring can or should be painted either. Many times, hardwood floors and laminates will have protective coatings on them to protect them and to give them more durability. But, these coatings will get in the way of your painting. If you have a wood flooring that has a coating like this, you may need to seek the manufacturers advice on how to handle the painting.

Still other wood flooring is troublesome because it has been stained. While many times you can paint over stain, you need to take protective and careful measures to insure that you do not damage the wood in your painting process.

Once you have found out just what your painting entails, you can get started with the task at hand. In most cases, a properly clean and repaired floor is necessary to start with. In these cases, you will find that you will need to prime the wood prior to getting started with painting. You will also need to adjust your type of paint to match the type of wood as well as any protective coating and stain that is on that wood. All in all, painting wood is quite doable, if you take the right measures to get it done correctly.

How to Painting Window Frames

It seems like there’s always a window in need of painting, whether you’re matching a new room scheme or just sprucing things up. The actual painting isn’t difficult, but you should know what you’re getting into before you start. If you can, remove the window frames before painting them. Newer windows are released by pushing them against their spring-loaded jambs. Don’t paint the edges of windows – they’ll slide easier if unpainted. Older windows – those with sash cord weights – are more difficult. You can paint older windows in place, but don’t paint them shut.

1. To paint double-hung windows, you’ll want to remove them from their frames. Newer, spring-mounted windows are released by pushing against the frame. If you have an older window, consider painting it in place.

 

2. Drill holes and insert two nails into the legs of a wooden stepladder, and mount the window easel-style for easy painting. Or, lay the window flat on a bench or sawhorses. Don’t paint the sides or the bottom of the sashes.

 

3. Using a tapered sash brush, begin by painting the wood next to the glass. Use the narrow edge of brush and overlap paint onto the glass to create a weathertight seal.

 

4. Clean any excess paint off the glass with a putty knife wrapped in a clean cloth. Rewrap the knife often so that you always wipe with a clean piece of fabric. Overlap the paint onto the glass about 1/16 of an inch to create a good seal.

 

5. Paint the flat portions of the sashes, then the case moldings, the sill, and the apron. Use slow, careful brush strokes. If you’re painting with the sash in place, you’ll want to avoid getting paint between the sash and frame. For casement windows, open them up completely before painting.

 

6. If you must paint your windows in place, move the painted windows up and down several times during the drying period to keep them from sticking. You can use a putty knife to avoid touching the painted surfaces.

Painting Trim

Painting trim is one of the many ways you can liven up interiors or exteriors. Use an accent color that complements the main colors of your wall and ceiling surfaces, or paint your trim white to embolden and emphasize the other colors. Typically, working with trim requires a brush and is slower going than painting large surfaces such as walls. Take your time – it’s worth the patience.

1. Protect your wall and floor surfaces with a wide wallboard knife, with a plastic shielding tool, or masking tape.

 

 

 

2. Be sure to wipe the paint off your wallboard knife or shielding tool each time it’s moved to keep paint from getting on trim and surrounding areas.

 

 

 

3. Paint deep-patterned surfaces such as ornate trim and moldings with a stiff-bristled brush, like a stenciling brush. Use small circular strokes to help penetrate into the recesses.

Paint Tips

What is Paint?
Paint consists of:

• Pigments for color.
• Binders that hold the pigments together.
• Liquid that disperses and delivers the pigments.
• Additives that supply traits such as moisture resistance.


More Painting Tips

Paint Safety
Before beginning any paint project, make certain you are working in a well ventilated room.

Clean As You Go
When painting, keep a damp rag handy to clean up as you go. It’s much easier to clean paint that is still wet.

Paintbrush Overload
For a quicker and more efficient paint job, don’t overload the paintbrush or roller. If it drips, there’s too much paint.

Door Painting
When you’re painting a door, waiting between coats for each side to dry can be time consuming. Here’s a shortcut. First, drive nails into the four corners and attach a length of rope. Loop each rope once around a rafter or beam. After painting one side, you can flip the work over, unlooping the ropes, to paint the other side.

Paint Spray Technique
Using a paint sprayer can give you some versatility for your next project. Using a spray gun rather than a roller or brush allows you the option of varying color schemes by fading and layering colors. You can achieve this by moving closer or farther away from your surface. To ensure a smooth finish, move at a consistent speed across your surface and remember to always clean your machine and hoses to avoid clogging.

Power Paint Sprayer
Use a power sprayer to cut days off your next big exterior paint job. Apply a thin coat first as a primer, using even, steady strokes that overlap. Start at the bottom and work your way up, so you can get at the underside of your clapboards or shingles. Allow this coat to dry and apply final coats the same way. Remember to keep the sprayer and its attachments clean and clog-free.

Paintbrush cleaning
Cleaning paintbrushes is a messy job, but someone’s got to do it. First wipe off as much excess as you can. If you’re using latex paint, work the bristles in warm soapy water. For oil-based paint, first clean brushes in a glass or metal container in an inch of solvent, then use warm soapy water. Smooth clean bristles with an old comb.

Painting Time
When painting a room which has surfaces that are in good shape, plan on spending about half as much time on preparation and clean-up as the actual painting. Where surfaces are in poor shape, non-painting time will increase accordingly, and may take more time than the paint application itself. To save time in cleaning up paint trays, either line them with aluminum foil before starting, or simply slip smaller trash bags over them.

Carrying Paint
Smaller quart-size paint cans are hard to carry and easy to tip over. To avoid these problems, try this: Put the quart paint can inside of an empty gallon can that has a handle. It will be easier to carry and, if it spills inside of the larger can, you can just pour the paint back into the quart can.

Painter tape
When masking off areas around trim etc. Use quality painters tape. This tape is wider than most masking tape, it doesn’t absorb the paint and is easy to apply and remove. It usually comes with an adhesive strip along one edge which covers about a 1/3 of the width of the tape. Don’t use plain old masking tape.

Paint Storage
To prevent air from entering partially used paint cans, store them upside down after placing the top on firmly.

Painting Tips for Interior Painting

Foam Rollers > Foam rollers can really assist in getting a beautiful smooth wall finish. They are easy to use and spatter very little. Try them for your next paint job! (They won’t work on heavily textured or rough surfaces however.) Foam brushes on the other hand are mainly useful only for small paint jobs since they may not stand up to doing an entire room.

Pad Painters > Smooth pad painters are extremely useful and offer neat application and simple cleanup.

Just make sure you only ‘float’ the pad on top of the paint to load it, since once the pad is submerged into the paint it can become a drippy mess and you’ll need to take it apart, clean it, and start over.

Rollers > Look for rollers with plastic interiors (rather than cardboard) for longer life. Foam rollers are great for use on smooth walls. Otherwise, choose the roller nap (the thickness of the fluffy covering) according to the texture of your wall. Flat smooth walls need a flat smooth roller. Rougher walls need thicker rollers so paint will get down into all the crevices.

Latex Paint > Experts agree that latext paints are friendlier to the environment than oil paints. Latex gives you a faster drying time and requires only water cleanup. Use synthetic bristle brushes (not natural bristle) with latex paints.

Oil Paint > Die hard traditionalists still like oil paints. Use natural bristle brushes for oil paints and get advice at the paint store on cleaning brushes and rollers.

Keep Paint Covered > Exposure to air causes latex paint to skim over, so it’s best to keep the can of paint covered whenever possible. Pour small amounts of paint into a roller tray or small cardboard paint buckets and work from those.

Drop Cloths > Newspaper won’t give your floors enough protection. Plastic sheeting can be slippery. A good environmentally-friendly choice are large heavy canvas drop cloths available at paint stores or home centers. These can be folded to fit most any size room, are not slippery, and can be reused endlessly. Tape down the edges so spills won’t get under the cloth. If you have hardwood floors be sure to vacuum them before putting a drop cloth down.

Tinted Primer > When you purchase paint ask to have cans of primer tinted to match your wall color. Lighter colors can be matched fairly well, though primers won’t take enough pigment to match deeper wall colors. Using tinted primer can often save painting an extra finish coat. Some ceiling white paint is being marketed that is tinted blue when wet, drying to white, which may offer better control and coverage during painting.

Blue Tape > Painter’s blue tape is available in several widths. It is strong yet won’t pull up existing paint in most cases. The tape has a slightly waxy coating that helps seal out paint from seeping underneath. Simply “zip” down a length of tape with the back of a spoon or a knife blade in order to activate the seal. Test this on your surface first with the paint you’ll be using to see how well it works. The seal will only be effective on smooth surfaces. Also, use a minimum of paint near the tape to reduce the chances of seep-through. Remove blue tape when no longer needed, and leave it up only couple of days at the most.

Painting Tips for Homeowners

Comparing Oil and Latex Paints

Durability-Good adhesion is probably the single most important property of paints, because it helps prevent blistering , flaking and cracking.

Latex- Top quality latex paints that contain top quality acrylic binders provide maximum adhesion to most surfaces. Latex paints are also very flexible, so they continue to adhere even when temperature changes cause the surface to expand and contract. This elasticity helps forestall chipping, peeling, flaking and other common paint failures.
? Oil-Alkyd paints also have excellent adhesion, and perform better than latex over heavily chalked surfaces. But with time, the alkyd can embrittle, sometimes resulting in cracking in just a few years.

Color Retention

Latex-Top quality acrylic latex paints provide superior resistance to bleaching and fading,, even when exposed to damaging ultraviolet sun rays.
Oil-Alkyd paints fade faster than latex paints. They are more likely to chalk (develop a powdery substance on their surface), which causes the color to whiten.

Ease of Application

Latex-Latex paints glide smoothly from the brush or roller onto the surface. Top quality latex paints are especially easy to apply, since recently developed additives provide even application and spatter resistance.
Oil-Compared to latex paints, alkyd paints are more difficult to apply,, especially when brushing a large area, because they have more “drag”. On the other hand, they go on heavier and give more complete one-coat hiding and coverage.

Mildew Resistance

Latex-Top quality acrylic latex paints contain mildewcides to discourage mildew and help the paint maintain a fresh appearance.
Oil-Alkyd paints, while also containing mildewcides, are derived from vegetable oils which provide nutrients for mildew growth.

Variety of Uses

Latex-Latex paints can be used on wood, concrete, metal, vinyl siding, aluminum siding, brick and stucco.
Oil-Alkyd paints should not be directly applied to galvanized metal. They also require special chemical pre-treatments before use on new concrete, stucco and other masonry surfaces.

Odor

Latex-Latex paints have little odor and are non-flammable.
Oil-Alkyd paints have noticeably more odor owing to the solvents and oils they contain.

Clean-up

Latex-Latex paints clean up easily with soap and water.
Oil-Alkyd paints require solvents for clean up, making the chore messy and complicated.

Drying Time

Latex-Latex paints dry in just a couple of hours, so you can recoat quickly. However they are vulnerable in case of sudden rain.
Oil-Drying time for alkyd paints can take up to two days- plenty of time for dirt, insects and people to come in contact with the surface and potential to mar it permanently.

Painting Safety Tips

Before tackling how-to painting projects, it is crucial to “brush up” on safety tips. Since painting is the most popular D-I-Y project, please read on to learn how to paint your home safely.

General Tips

You’ve heard it before, but please read the label on the paint can and follow manufacturer’s instructions. If the paint is flammable or combustible, take these precautions:

• Open windows and doors to create ventilation and disperse fumes.
• Eliminate all sources of flame, sparks and ignition (put out pilot lights by turning off the gas and do not re-• • • light until after room is free of fumes).
• While working with flammable or combustible paints, don’t smoke.
• Don’t use electrical equipment while working with paints (it may cause sparks)
• Make sure light bulbs are not exposed to sudden breakage.
• Clean up spills promptly.
• Keep containers closed when not in use.

Outfitting Yourself for Painting

• Wear long sleeve shirt and long pants when painting.
• Wear butyl rubber gloves. This will protect skin and make cleanup easier.
• Wear chemical splash goggles and paint respirator.

Health Precautions

• If paint is swallowed, follow the first-aid directions on the label and contact doctor or poison center immediately.
• While painting, if you feel dizzy or nauseous, leave work area and get fresh air. If discomfort persists, seek medical help.
• If solvent paint gets on your skin, wash immediately with soap and water.
• If solvent paint gets in your eyes, flush eyes with cold water for 15 minutes and obtain medical treatment.

Storing Paint Properly

• Follow label instructions for storing.
• Before storing, make sure containers are tightly sealed.
• Do not store near heat sources such as furnaces and space heaters.
• If you have a very small amount of solvent left, dispose of it properly; don’t store it.
• Keep paint products out of reach of children.
• Do not store or re-use empty containers.

Painting Preparation Tips

Preparation is a necessity in whatever things you are intended to do. In painting, preparation is a must. You can’t just roll the paint or brush paint to your walls, ceilings or anything, it will only turn out ugly instead of making it beautiful. Surely, it will not only waste your things, but you will also waste your time and effort.

In painting, the number 1 reason for its failure is poor preparation. Here are some useful painting preparation tips that will surely help you.

Plan out well what is your color scheme before even buying paint. Think twice before choosing the color you want. Match it to your other décor and consider well what well be its effect to your other things. Be sure also that you have all the things and materials needed before starting so you won’t have to go back and fort to the store to buy it.

Next, prepare the surface of what you are going to paint. Whether you are painting an iron chair, staining a wood end table, walls, ceilings or anything, preparing the surface is absolutely important. If the paint doesn’t have a clean, smooth surface to adhere to, it won’t last long and definitely it won’t look good. Like in walls, it should be sanded, spackled and cleaned, for paint to adhere properly.

If you are painting a room, prepare it too. Remove all your furniture before you begin. If you can’t remove some of your things, use a newspaper or a drop cloth to cover it and floor. Undoubtedly, you don’t want paints splattering over it. Remove also outlet covers, light fixtures, door knobs, electrical switches and other hardware and so if won’t bother your painting.

If the surface is shiny or high-gloss, clean it also and have it sanded in order for the paint to bond. If you are painting a wall, scrape off the wallpapers and flaking paints. Painting over wallpaper will not look good. But if you still want to paint over it, be sure that the paper is tight and does not contain any bleeding colors. You can also apply primer if necessary. If the surface has been painted before, you only need to repaint the patched or repaired areas.

Tape off also the window frames, baseboards or any areas that you don’t want to be painted. This will avoid paint drips and smudges to these areas.

Look also for cracks in the surface. Fill them with patching plasters, filler, wood putty or other suitable compound, whichever is appropriate. When the patch is dry, sand it lightly so that they will level to the surface. Fill nail holes with spackling compound and sand it lightly. To inspect the repaired damages and trim work, dig out rot and filling depression with wood filler.

If you’re painting a metal, sand the entire object so that the rust will be removed and any rough areas are leveled with the rest of the object. It will look better after it is painted if it has a smooth surface. Wash also the surface with good detergent to get rid of the grease, dust and dirt, then rinse it with clean water and let it dry completely.

Following these tips will result to a beautiful and flawless painting. This will definitely save your energy, time and money. Now you are ready to paint.

Painting Metal Tips

There are many different painting metal tips that you can take and run with. There are several different types of metal. Your first step is to know which type you plan to paint and then learn how to paint it. Why take so much time to learn about painting metal? It is quite simple. If you know how to paint it properly, it will come out beautifully. Here are some of the steps you need to take when painting metal. Tips like these are important to follow!

You will want to start with a clean, dry surface no matter what. Non ferrous metals will require that you use an etching liquid on them so that the paint sticks to the metal. You will then need to sand glossy surfaces to help with adhesion. You will also need to check for and repair any signs of corrosion on the surface as well.

What most people do not do when painting metal is to use a primer. Unfortunately, if you go without the primer you are asking for trouble! In areas where there is rust damage, use a rust inhibitive primer. Primers allow the paint to stick to the metal better while not “looking” bad. Depending on the type of metal that you are using, you will want to paint with the correct type of primer. For example if you are painting a ferrous metal, then look for a primer that will work in this situation best.

Other things that you need to do when painting metal include making sure that your paint is usable on metal, making sure to mix it well, and making sure that you get a good two coats on the surface. These tips are only the start of your project. You need to take the time to find out which type of paint you need and you need to make sure that safety is always the first priority.