How to Painting Window Frames

It seems like there’s always a window in need of painting, whether you’re matching a new room scheme or just sprucing things up. The actual painting isn’t difficult, but you should know what you’re getting into before you start. If you can, remove the window frames before painting them. Newer windows are released by pushing them against their spring-loaded jambs. Don’t paint the edges of windows – they’ll slide easier if unpainted. Older windows – those with sash cord weights – are more difficult. You can paint older windows in place, but don’t paint them shut.

1. To paint double-hung windows, you’ll want to remove them from their frames. Newer, spring-mounted windows are released by pushing against the frame. If you have an older window, consider painting it in place.

 

2. Drill holes and insert two nails into the legs of a wooden stepladder, and mount the window easel-style for easy painting. Or, lay the window flat on a bench or sawhorses. Don’t paint the sides or the bottom of the sashes.

 

3. Using a tapered sash brush, begin by painting the wood next to the glass. Use the narrow edge of brush and overlap paint onto the glass to create a weathertight seal.

 

4. Clean any excess paint off the glass with a putty knife wrapped in a clean cloth. Rewrap the knife often so that you always wipe with a clean piece of fabric. Overlap the paint onto the glass about 1/16 of an inch to create a good seal.

 

5. Paint the flat portions of the sashes, then the case moldings, the sill, and the apron. Use slow, careful brush strokes. If you’re painting with the sash in place, you’ll want to avoid getting paint between the sash and frame. For casement windows, open them up completely before painting.

 

6. If you must paint your windows in place, move the painted windows up and down several times during the drying period to keep them from sticking. You can use a putty knife to avoid touching the painted surfaces.

Painting Trim

Painting trim is one of the many ways you can liven up interiors or exteriors. Use an accent color that complements the main colors of your wall and ceiling surfaces, or paint your trim white to embolden and emphasize the other colors. Typically, working with trim requires a brush and is slower going than painting large surfaces such as walls. Take your time – it’s worth the patience.

1. Protect your wall and floor surfaces with a wide wallboard knife, with a plastic shielding tool, or masking tape.

 

 

 

2. Be sure to wipe the paint off your wallboard knife or shielding tool each time it’s moved to keep paint from getting on trim and surrounding areas.

 

 

 

3. Paint deep-patterned surfaces such as ornate trim and moldings with a stiff-bristled brush, like a stenciling brush. Use small circular strokes to help penetrate into the recesses.

Paint Tips

What is Paint?
Paint consists of:

• Pigments for color.
• Binders that hold the pigments together.
• Liquid that disperses and delivers the pigments.
• Additives that supply traits such as moisture resistance.


More Painting Tips

Paint Safety
Before beginning any paint project, make certain you are working in a well ventilated room.

Clean As You Go
When painting, keep a damp rag handy to clean up as you go. It’s much easier to clean paint that is still wet.

Paintbrush Overload
For a quicker and more efficient paint job, don’t overload the paintbrush or roller. If it drips, there’s too much paint.

Door Painting
When you’re painting a door, waiting between coats for each side to dry can be time consuming. Here’s a shortcut. First, drive nails into the four corners and attach a length of rope. Loop each rope once around a rafter or beam. After painting one side, you can flip the work over, unlooping the ropes, to paint the other side.

Paint Spray Technique
Using a paint sprayer can give you some versatility for your next project. Using a spray gun rather than a roller or brush allows you the option of varying color schemes by fading and layering colors. You can achieve this by moving closer or farther away from your surface. To ensure a smooth finish, move at a consistent speed across your surface and remember to always clean your machine and hoses to avoid clogging.

Power Paint Sprayer
Use a power sprayer to cut days off your next big exterior paint job. Apply a thin coat first as a primer, using even, steady strokes that overlap. Start at the bottom and work your way up, so you can get at the underside of your clapboards or shingles. Allow this coat to dry and apply final coats the same way. Remember to keep the sprayer and its attachments clean and clog-free.

Paintbrush cleaning
Cleaning paintbrushes is a messy job, but someone’s got to do it. First wipe off as much excess as you can. If you’re using latex paint, work the bristles in warm soapy water. For oil-based paint, first clean brushes in a glass or metal container in an inch of solvent, then use warm soapy water. Smooth clean bristles with an old comb.

Painting Time
When painting a room which has surfaces that are in good shape, plan on spending about half as much time on preparation and clean-up as the actual painting. Where surfaces are in poor shape, non-painting time will increase accordingly, and may take more time than the paint application itself. To save time in cleaning up paint trays, either line them with aluminum foil before starting, or simply slip smaller trash bags over them.

Carrying Paint
Smaller quart-size paint cans are hard to carry and easy to tip over. To avoid these problems, try this: Put the quart paint can inside of an empty gallon can that has a handle. It will be easier to carry and, if it spills inside of the larger can, you can just pour the paint back into the quart can.

Painter tape
When masking off areas around trim etc. Use quality painters tape. This tape is wider than most masking tape, it doesn’t absorb the paint and is easy to apply and remove. It usually comes with an adhesive strip along one edge which covers about a 1/3 of the width of the tape. Don’t use plain old masking tape.

Paint Storage
To prevent air from entering partially used paint cans, store them upside down after placing the top on firmly.

Painting Tips for Interior Painting

Foam Rollers > Foam rollers can really assist in getting a beautiful smooth wall finish. They are easy to use and spatter very little. Try them for your next paint job! (They won’t work on heavily textured or rough surfaces however.) Foam brushes on the other hand are mainly useful only for small paint jobs since they may not stand up to doing an entire room.

Pad Painters > Smooth pad painters are extremely useful and offer neat application and simple cleanup.

Just make sure you only ‘float’ the pad on top of the paint to load it, since once the pad is submerged into the paint it can become a drippy mess and you’ll need to take it apart, clean it, and start over.

Rollers > Look for rollers with plastic interiors (rather than cardboard) for longer life. Foam rollers are great for use on smooth walls. Otherwise, choose the roller nap (the thickness of the fluffy covering) according to the texture of your wall. Flat smooth walls need a flat smooth roller. Rougher walls need thicker rollers so paint will get down into all the crevices.

Latex Paint > Experts agree that latext paints are friendlier to the environment than oil paints. Latex gives you a faster drying time and requires only water cleanup. Use synthetic bristle brushes (not natural bristle) with latex paints.

Oil Paint > Die hard traditionalists still like oil paints. Use natural bristle brushes for oil paints and get advice at the paint store on cleaning brushes and rollers.

Keep Paint Covered > Exposure to air causes latex paint to skim over, so it’s best to keep the can of paint covered whenever possible. Pour small amounts of paint into a roller tray or small cardboard paint buckets and work from those.

Drop Cloths > Newspaper won’t give your floors enough protection. Plastic sheeting can be slippery. A good environmentally-friendly choice are large heavy canvas drop cloths available at paint stores or home centers. These can be folded to fit most any size room, are not slippery, and can be reused endlessly. Tape down the edges so spills won’t get under the cloth. If you have hardwood floors be sure to vacuum them before putting a drop cloth down.

Tinted Primer > When you purchase paint ask to have cans of primer tinted to match your wall color. Lighter colors can be matched fairly well, though primers won’t take enough pigment to match deeper wall colors. Using tinted primer can often save painting an extra finish coat. Some ceiling white paint is being marketed that is tinted blue when wet, drying to white, which may offer better control and coverage during painting.

Blue Tape > Painter’s blue tape is available in several widths. It is strong yet won’t pull up existing paint in most cases. The tape has a slightly waxy coating that helps seal out paint from seeping underneath. Simply “zip” down a length of tape with the back of a spoon or a knife blade in order to activate the seal. Test this on your surface first with the paint you’ll be using to see how well it works. The seal will only be effective on smooth surfaces. Also, use a minimum of paint near the tape to reduce the chances of seep-through. Remove blue tape when no longer needed, and leave it up only couple of days at the most.

Painting Tips for Homeowners

Comparing Oil and Latex Paints

Durability-Good adhesion is probably the single most important property of paints, because it helps prevent blistering , flaking and cracking.

Latex- Top quality latex paints that contain top quality acrylic binders provide maximum adhesion to most surfaces. Latex paints are also very flexible, so they continue to adhere even when temperature changes cause the surface to expand and contract. This elasticity helps forestall chipping, peeling, flaking and other common paint failures.
? Oil-Alkyd paints also have excellent adhesion, and perform better than latex over heavily chalked surfaces. But with time, the alkyd can embrittle, sometimes resulting in cracking in just a few years.

Color Retention

Latex-Top quality acrylic latex paints provide superior resistance to bleaching and fading,, even when exposed to damaging ultraviolet sun rays.
Oil-Alkyd paints fade faster than latex paints. They are more likely to chalk (develop a powdery substance on their surface), which causes the color to whiten.

Ease of Application

Latex-Latex paints glide smoothly from the brush or roller onto the surface. Top quality latex paints are especially easy to apply, since recently developed additives provide even application and spatter resistance.
Oil-Compared to latex paints, alkyd paints are more difficult to apply,, especially when brushing a large area, because they have more “drag”. On the other hand, they go on heavier and give more complete one-coat hiding and coverage.

Mildew Resistance

Latex-Top quality acrylic latex paints contain mildewcides to discourage mildew and help the paint maintain a fresh appearance.
Oil-Alkyd paints, while also containing mildewcides, are derived from vegetable oils which provide nutrients for mildew growth.

Variety of Uses

Latex-Latex paints can be used on wood, concrete, metal, vinyl siding, aluminum siding, brick and stucco.
Oil-Alkyd paints should not be directly applied to galvanized metal. They also require special chemical pre-treatments before use on new concrete, stucco and other masonry surfaces.

Odor

Latex-Latex paints have little odor and are non-flammable.
Oil-Alkyd paints have noticeably more odor owing to the solvents and oils they contain.

Clean-up

Latex-Latex paints clean up easily with soap and water.
Oil-Alkyd paints require solvents for clean up, making the chore messy and complicated.

Drying Time

Latex-Latex paints dry in just a couple of hours, so you can recoat quickly. However they are vulnerable in case of sudden rain.
Oil-Drying time for alkyd paints can take up to two days- plenty of time for dirt, insects and people to come in contact with the surface and potential to mar it permanently.

Painting Techniques

Have you ever visited a craft show or gift shop, and wondered how the manufacturers get those brand new hand crafted items, to look like antiques? Well, there are many different techniques used for aging new items. Here are just a few that are easy to do, using a variety of different items.

First, we will talk about distressing items. Take a brand new teddy bear for example, his fur is in wonderful shape, no worn spots, his stuffing is firm and in place. But you want this bear to look like a small child has loved him for years. Take a razor or electric clippers and just start trimming that brand new looking little furry creature. Basically around the muzzle and ears, and anywhere he would have been rubbed by little hands, you can also give him a tea dye bath which I will describe later on.

Also for wooden items, such as signs, toys or shelving, break out the sandpaper, hammer and even a screw driver, start taking out your frustrations on the piece of wood in front of you. Beat it, scrape it and sand the edges to make them look worn. Then you can use a medium colored stain to darken the wood and stain the paint. Just put on one light coat and let dry.

You can also add age spots to any items by mixing a bit of black or dark brown paint with a little water, to make it ink-like in consistency. Just dab this on lightly with a paint brush; anywhere you feel a little age spot would be appropriate.

Have you ever seen a sign that looks like the wood had been kept in a work shop? This method is called spattering. After you have painted your project, take an old toothbrush, it is helpful to trim the bristles to between 1/4 and ½ inches long. Dip your toothbrush in water, and now in a spot of paint, color doesn’t matter, but you will need it to contrast with the background color of the painted item. It is also best to place your object on newspaper or in a cardboard box, to keep from spattering your paint everywhere. Now, with the toothbrush facing the project, run your thumb down the bristles of the toothbrush, and spatter the paint onto the surface of your project. You can also spatter with more than one color. Just rinse your toothbrush out, and after the first spattering is dried, re-spatter. Items can also be distressed after this procedure.

Old fabrics generally are stained also, and staining your fabric is very easy to do, with tea. Choose a large container that will hold your project. Fill the container halfway with boiling water and then add about 8 regular tea bags to the water, I usually add some vanilla extract and cinnamon with this too. Wait for the water to cool so that your project will not shrink. Now just toss in your project and allow soaking. Some people recommend removing the tea bags, but I like leaving them in the water, since they will touch the project and make a darker stain in some spots. You can leave this soak for several hours or overnight. Remove, and set out to dry. You can actually even set the item on the edge of the bowl face down and let all of the excess tea run into the face, which will leave interesting looking marks.

If you want to add a few more spots to your item, take a wet tea bag and just tap it on your project. If you are tea dying fabric to use for a project, it can be tossed in the dryer, and then pressed before cutting out your items. This process can be done with any fabric items, such as doll clothes, doll bodies and teddy bears.

There are several aging products on the market one is called “Age it” and another “Crackle it”. This is just painted on a surface after a base coat is painted. If you are going to paint a surface that will be white or another light color when finished, start with a dark base coat. Now paint on the product, it will chemically change the first coat of paint so it will react with the last coat.

Lastly, paint on the final color coat. Watch the chemical reaction taking place, the paint will crack and bubble, giving your project an aging paint looks Very similar to old weathered wood.

These are just a few of the techniques that I use to “age” my craft projects to make them look older than they really are.

Painting Safety Tips

Before tackling how-to painting projects, it is crucial to “brush up” on safety tips. Since painting is the most popular D-I-Y project, please read on to learn how to paint your home safely.

General Tips

You’ve heard it before, but please read the label on the paint can and follow manufacturer’s instructions. If the paint is flammable or combustible, take these precautions:

• Open windows and doors to create ventilation and disperse fumes.
• Eliminate all sources of flame, sparks and ignition (put out pilot lights by turning off the gas and do not re-• • • light until after room is free of fumes).
• While working with flammable or combustible paints, don’t smoke.
• Don’t use electrical equipment while working with paints (it may cause sparks)
• Make sure light bulbs are not exposed to sudden breakage.
• Clean up spills promptly.
• Keep containers closed when not in use.

Outfitting Yourself for Painting

• Wear long sleeve shirt and long pants when painting.
• Wear butyl rubber gloves. This will protect skin and make cleanup easier.
• Wear chemical splash goggles and paint respirator.

Health Precautions

• If paint is swallowed, follow the first-aid directions on the label and contact doctor or poison center immediately.
• While painting, if you feel dizzy or nauseous, leave work area and get fresh air. If discomfort persists, seek medical help.
• If solvent paint gets on your skin, wash immediately with soap and water.
• If solvent paint gets in your eyes, flush eyes with cold water for 15 minutes and obtain medical treatment.

Storing Paint Properly

• Follow label instructions for storing.
• Before storing, make sure containers are tightly sealed.
• Do not store near heat sources such as furnaces and space heaters.
• If you have a very small amount of solvent left, dispose of it properly; don’t store it.
• Keep paint products out of reach of children.
• Do not store or re-use empty containers.

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How to Handle the Holidays in a Small Space.

If you live in a 362-square-foot cottage with your husband, toddler and two beagles, do you have to gather with the clan around someone else’s table every Thanksgiving and instantly regift everything you get for Christmas? As a mother of three grown children who is thinking about drastically downsizing with the hubby from a suburban house 10 times that size (and crammed with 20 years of memories) to a small city condo, I wanted to know.

So I asked small-space lifestyle blogger and consultant Whitney Leigh Morris — who lives and works in the aforementioned cottage, aka The Tiny Canal Cottage in the Venice area of Los Angeles — how she navigates the holidays with husband Adam Winkleman and their son, West. Her first book, Small Space Style.

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Does your living room have a case of the blahs? Whether you’re looking for quick furniture-arranging help or a complete overhaul, read on for the need-to-know info on making your living room live up to its full potential. We caught up with interior designer Mollie Openshaw to get the scoop on costs, time frames and picking the right pro for the job.