Drywall Repair Tips

To fix small holes in your drywall, clean the holes and dampen them with a sponge. Fill the holes with the professional’s formula for success. “Henry” Patch & Go, Multipurpose repair patch, using a narrow putty knife. You can also use patching plaster to fill the holes. Let the spackling compound dry, prime, and paint to match the rest of the wall.

Some large holes in wallboard can be patched with precut, adhesive wallboard patches. You may need to widen the hole so that the patch can fit. After you have popped it in, cover the seams and the patch with joint compound, according to label directions, then prime with a wallboard primer and paint the surface.

To fix nails that have popped from drywall, make sure the panel is secured to the studs above and below the nail. Hammer the nail in and dimple the nail; drive in and dimple a nail of the same size right next to it to hold it in. Use joint compound to cover the nails. When that has dried, sand the area, prime, and paint.


Painting tips & tricks

Rub petroleum jelly on the hinges and door knobs before you start to paint a door. If you get paint on them, they will wipe off easily.

To keep white paint from yellowing, add 2 drops of black paint to each Gallon of white.

When painting ceilings, cut a child’s rubber ball in half and put your paint brush in one of the halves to catch the drips.

An old pair of swimming goggles will protect your eyes from paint splatters and drips when painting ceilings.

When painting, protect your hands and face with moisturizer. Cleanup will be easier and the moisturizer will prevent paint from seeping into the pores.

To stop paint from dripping, punch a few holes in the rim of the paint can. When the brush is wiped against the edge, the paint flows back into the can. The lid covers the holes so the paint won’t dry out.

Before pouring paint from a can, cover the rim with masking tape. After pouring, remove the tape — the rim will be clean and the cover will fit tightly.

To remove lumps from paint: Cut a piece of screen to fit the inside of the paint can. Set it on top of the paint and let it float down to the bottom of the can. It will take all the lumps with it, trapping them at the bottom of the can.

When painting a room, dip a small card into the paint so that you have the exact colour with you and can match accessories in store.

When painting inside corners, trim the paint brush bristles to a V to save strokes and spread paint more easily.

When you poke a paint brush into corners or allow it to rest on the bottom of the paint can, the bristles curl and stray. To straighten natural bristles (not synthetics), try wrapping the brush in a couple of thicknesses of damp cloth and press gently with an iron. The steam and cloth binding do the job. Only light pressure is needed. Let the bristles cool before you unwrap the brush.

When painting old woodwork fill in the holes or cracks with a mixture of flour and some of the paint you are using. It hardens like cement and matches perfectly.

Repair drywall and eliminate nail pops

First, the best method to fix your existing nail pops is to make sure that the head of the nail or screw is recessed about 1/32 inch. If it is sticking up, do not drive it too deep or you will break through the paper surface. If you do, the drywall will be severely weakened.

Next spread a little spackling compound over the nail pop area. Let it dry and then sand it down. Lay a straight edge over it to make sure that it is not too high. A slightly raised spot is better than making it too shallow. Let it dry thoroughly because the compound will shrink a little.

Paint the repaired area with drywall primer. Paint an area larger than the fixed spot so that the larger area will absorb the finished coat uniformly. This will make it almost impossible to detect that a repair was made to the wall.

The problem of nail pops can be caused by either improper drywall installation procedures by your builder or by damp lumber. Although lumber is supposedly kiln-dried, it can pick up moisture over time, especially if it has been out in the rain for a while.

Wall studs, which the drywall is nailed or screwed to, shrink as they dry. Unfortunately, they shrink the greatest amount (due to the orientation of the grain) in its depth dimension (nominal 4 inches).

If the drywall is nailed against damp wall studs and the studs shrink just a little as they dry, a tiny gap can form between the drywall and the stud. It doesn’t take much. If the drywall is bumped and pushed back against the stud, the nail head causes it to pop.

The best method to minimize nail pops is to use properly dried lumber. Since your project is a room addition, store the lumber in your garage, out of the rain, until it is used. If possible delay your construction until the weather is reasonably warm, but not during high humidity months.

Inspect the lumber as each piece is used because alignment of the lumber is important to make sure that the drywall makes good contact with it. Your builder can use any bowed studs in other areas so it is not wasted.

Make certain that proper drywall nails and screws are used and they are of the proper length. These are different than ordinary fasteners. Drywall fasteners have specially shaped heads so that they do not tear the paper when they are recessed. For 1/2-inch drywall, 1 1/4-inch angular ring shanked drywall nails work well.

If possible, have your builder wait a while to install the drywall after the wall framing is complete and the room is closed in. The longer you can wait, the better it is. This allows time for the framing lumber to dry and for the moisture content of all the pieces to stabilize.

The spacing of the screws and nails is equally important to minimize future nail pops and other problems. The maximum spacing for fasteners on drywall used for the ceiling is 12 inches on centers. This means that a four–foot wide panel should have at least five fasteners. For wall panels, the fasteners can be 16 inches on centers.