Poor Gloss Retention Exterior Paint Solution

Poor Gloss Retention: Deterioration of the paint film, resulting in excessive or rapid loss of luster of the top coat.

Possible Causes:

Use of an interior paint outdoors.

Use of a lower quality paint.

Use of a gloss alkyd or oil-based paint in areas of direct sunlight.

Solution:

Direct sunshine can degrade the binder and pigment of a paint, causing it to chalk and lose its gloss. While all types of paint will lose some degree of luster over time, lower quality paints will generally lose gloss much earlier than better grades. The binder in top quality acrylic latex paint is especially resistant to UV radiation, while oil and alkyd binders actually absorb the radiation, causing the binders to break down. Surface preparation for a coating showing poor gloss retention should be similar to that used in chalking surfaces see Chalking.

DRAGGING | RAGGING

DRAGGING

Smooth the surface and then cover with one or two coats of matte oil-based paint. Next, apply the tinted oil glaze over the matte paint in vertical strips 2 ft (60 cm) wide. When the glaze is applied, take a flogger brush and drag it down the wall in vertical strokes. The color of the matte paint will show through the glaze. As you work, wipe off the excess glaze from the brush with a lint cloth. Use the brush firmly.

DRAG THE FLOGGER DOWN THE WALL


RAGGING

Ragging creates an indistinct patterned effect. Apply a coat of matte oil-based paint to a prepared surface. Brush on the glaze. Bunch up a lint-free cloth and dab off the glaze from the surface. After 30 minutes, brush over with the tip of a softening brush to soften.


THE OVERALL EFFECT OF RAGGING
Ragging creates a very subtle effect. The color and pattern on a finished surface should look like a soft blur.


SOFTENING THE EFFECT
With ragging you soften the color twice, first with a lint cloth and second with the tips of a softening brush.