6 Exterior Decorating Tips To Revitalize Your Home

Spring has finally sprung, and it’s the perfect time to make a start on those DIY jobs that make a massive difference to how your home looks and feels – especially those exterior decorating projects!

We’re going to give you our top tips on sprucing up the exterior of your home so that you’re ready to welcome friends and family around for a BBQ or garden party.

Revitalise your house with these 6 exterior decorating projects

Paint Your Garden Fence:
A new colour will lift the whole exterior of your property, so rub that fence down with a wire brush and apply a couple of coats of wood treatment. Make sure that you use a soft brush to remove any loose dirt before applying the first coat. Easy to apply and offering many colour options, it’s ideal for the DIYer and provides 5 years of protection.

Paint Your Gate:
Is your metal gate looking sorry for itself? A rub down with some wire wool and sandpaper to remove any rust and dirt will prepare it perfectly for some metallic paint. Lay a sheet down to protect the floor, give it a good clean with sugar soap, and then apply primer. Once dry you can use a small brush to apply two coats of metal paint.

Paint Your Doorstep:
A coat or three of decent masonry paint can transform a worn doorstep and give your house a completely new look. As with all masonry painting, prep first with a good sand and clean before applying the paint.

Paint Your Window Sills And Surrounds:
Old Toronto terrace houses often have concrete window sills that look fantastic when painted. Rub them down with wire wool, fill in any holes with ready mixed stone repair and rendering, and then apply primer and paint. Use the same colour and technique for the arches and surrounds.

Jet Wash Your Paths:
A year’s worth of muck and grime will make any exterior paths or driveways look terrible, but a day with a hired jet wash and some elbow grease and your paths will soon look sparkling clean!

Paint Your House:
A fresh coat of paint to your house’s exterior will make it look like a new property. It’s best to stick to fairly simple and neutral colours in our climate rather than attempting to bring a little continental sparkle with a brighter colour – we simply don’t have the quality of light to pull that off successfully so white works best.

None of these jobs should be too much for the brave DIY enthusiast, but we’re always here to offer some friendly advice. Some exterior decorating projects can feel a little overwhelming for the novice though, so if you live in Toronto or surrounding areas, please feel free to contact The Toronto Painters for a quote!

Source: https://thetorontopainters.ca/

Here’s a trick well-known to old-time painters

Here’s a trick well-known to old-time painters

Here´s a trick well-known to old-time painters. The stucco coating on the exterior wall surfaces of nineteenth-century masonry houses was marked out to look like blocks of stone. Narrow horizontal and vertical grooves were impressed into the surface of the stucco coating to give the walls the appearance of the regular blocks of stone known as ashlar. After repainting the outside of your house run a carpenter´s pencil along the grooves. This sharpens up the appearance of the building and reinforces the impression of ´stone´ blocks. The impression works best if the paint chosen is in a stone colour.


Painting tips & tricks

Decorating Tips

Make a room plan

Make a rough sketch of your room, and photocopy the sketch. Use coloured pencils to experiment.

Choose a scheme to suit the room

Pick warm colours for walls with northern light, cool colours for southern and neutrals for all other exposures

Bright Accessories

Use accessories to balance strong colours on walls.

Use strong shades in moderation

Too much strong colour can overwhelm a room, but by emphasizing individual walls you can create an optical illusion and alter a room’s proportions.

Keep a steady hand

Strong colours hide imperfections – a good idea for rough or uneven walls. Apply paint carefully as uneven strokes will show.


Dip and Smack vs Wiping

As an amateur painter you probably are in the habit of “wiping” the brush on the lip of the can after every dip. This creates two problems: the lip of the can will fill with paint and drip down the sides, and the bristles can be damaged. There is a dip and smack technique that is easy to perform and will help you to get the job done right. Dip the brush into the paint, and as you pull the brush up, smack it on the sides of the paint can from one side to the other instead of wiping. This “wakes up” the bristles, allows more paint to stay in the brush and eliminates paint from accumulating in the lip of the paint can.


Paint – Dry stripping

This entails the use of a scraper, with a very sharp blade, to remove the paint. It is recommended that you wear safety goggles to prevent flakes of paint from shooting into your eyes. If the paint being removed is very old, wear a mask to prevent your inhaling the dust. Angle the blade until it hooks into the surface, and pull it towards you with even pressure.


Drywall Primer

Primer is an important part of any painting job. Picking the right primer can be a particularly confusing task. You can use the following basic requirements to help you choose the right product for your drywall job.

New drywall needs at least one coat of latex primer. Keep in mind that a good primer coat will still show brush and roller marks. You may need two coats over water-resistant (green colored) dry wall, or areas that have a lot of drywall mud. Generally, one coat of primer is sufficient. You are better off to apply a second coat of the finish paint. Remember that the primer color should be a lighter match but close to the finish color. In other words, don´t use a white primer under a dark blue finish coat; a blue tinted primer will work much better.


Easily Touch-Up Woodwork

To easily touch-up woodwork (if using white finish only), here’s what to do:

Clean trimwork of all dirt and grime

Lay a protective barrier over flooring (next to base), such as cardboard or blue masking tape.

Lightly (and gently – no drips or runs) spray paint onto base or other trimwork. You’ll want to “feather” it, so the finish will appear consistent.

Let dry before moving on to painting other surface(s).

It’s important to note here, that you are touching up the base, and other trimwork, before you paint anything else. Then, after the woodwork is fully dried, you can apply finish paint. If you get wall paint on the trim, simply wipe off with a wet rag (keeping one handy at all times).

Also, make sure the trimwork throughout the room has a good, solid base coat of paint on it prior to doing any kind of touch-up work. Touch-up only when the existing coat looks good and fresh, or nearly freshly painted.

Again, this is a great tip to save you a fair amount of time and money, but not at the expense of the room’s appearance, and overall condition. (this is really handy for rental property owners)


Enamel

Enamel is a varnish with pigments added. Enamel has the same basic durability and toughness of a good varnish. It produces an easy-to-clean surface, and in the proper formulation, can be used for interior and exterior applications. For the highest quality interior work, an undercoat is required.