Paint Tips

What is Paint?
Paint consists of:

• Pigments for color.
• Binders that hold the pigments together.
• Liquid that disperses and delivers the pigments.
• Additives that supply traits such as moisture resistance.


More Painting Tips

Paint Safety
Before beginning any paint project, make certain you are working in a well ventilated room.

Clean As You Go
When painting, keep a damp rag handy to clean up as you go. It’s much easier to clean paint that is still wet.

Paintbrush Overload
For a quicker and more efficient paint job, don’t overload the paintbrush or roller. If it drips, there’s too much paint.

Door Painting
When you’re painting a door, waiting between coats for each side to dry can be time consuming. Here’s a shortcut. First, drive nails into the four corners and attach a length of rope. Loop each rope once around a rafter or beam. After painting one side, you can flip the work over, unlooping the ropes, to paint the other side.

Paint Spray Technique
Using a paint sprayer can give you some versatility for your next project. Using a spray gun rather than a roller or brush allows you the option of varying color schemes by fading and layering colors. You can achieve this by moving closer or farther away from your surface. To ensure a smooth finish, move at a consistent speed across your surface and remember to always clean your machine and hoses to avoid clogging.

Power Paint Sprayer
Use a power sprayer to cut days off your next big exterior paint job. Apply a thin coat first as a primer, using even, steady strokes that overlap. Start at the bottom and work your way up, so you can get at the underside of your clapboards or shingles. Allow this coat to dry and apply final coats the same way. Remember to keep the sprayer and its attachments clean and clog-free.

Paintbrush cleaning
Cleaning paintbrushes is a messy job, but someone’s got to do it. First wipe off as much excess as you can. If you’re using latex paint, work the bristles in warm soapy water. For oil-based paint, first clean brushes in a glass or metal container in an inch of solvent, then use warm soapy water. Smooth clean bristles with an old comb.

Painting Time
When painting a room which has surfaces that are in good shape, plan on spending about half as much time on preparation and clean-up as the actual painting. Where surfaces are in poor shape, non-painting time will increase accordingly, and may take more time than the paint application itself. To save time in cleaning up paint trays, either line them with aluminum foil before starting, or simply slip smaller trash bags over them.

Carrying Paint
Smaller quart-size paint cans are hard to carry and easy to tip over. To avoid these problems, try this: Put the quart paint can inside of an empty gallon can that has a handle. It will be easier to carry and, if it spills inside of the larger can, you can just pour the paint back into the quart can.

Painter tape
When masking off areas around trim etc. Use quality painters tape. This tape is wider than most masking tape, it doesn’t absorb the paint and is easy to apply and remove. It usually comes with an adhesive strip along one edge which covers about a 1/3 of the width of the tape. Don’t use plain old masking tape.

Paint Storage
To prevent air from entering partially used paint cans, store them upside down after placing the top on firmly.

Painting Tips for Interior Painting

Foam Rollers > Foam rollers can really assist in getting a beautiful smooth wall finish. They are easy to use and spatter very little. Try them for your next paint job! (They won’t work on heavily textured or rough surfaces however.) Foam brushes on the other hand are mainly useful only for small paint jobs since they may not stand up to doing an entire room.

Pad Painters > Smooth pad painters are extremely useful and offer neat application and simple cleanup.

Just make sure you only ‘float’ the pad on top of the paint to load it, since once the pad is submerged into the paint it can become a drippy mess and you’ll need to take it apart, clean it, and start over.

Rollers > Look for rollers with plastic interiors (rather than cardboard) for longer life. Foam rollers are great for use on smooth walls. Otherwise, choose the roller nap (the thickness of the fluffy covering) according to the texture of your wall. Flat smooth walls need a flat smooth roller. Rougher walls need thicker rollers so paint will get down into all the crevices.

Latex Paint > Experts agree that latext paints are friendlier to the environment than oil paints. Latex gives you a faster drying time and requires only water cleanup. Use synthetic bristle brushes (not natural bristle) with latex paints.

Oil Paint > Die hard traditionalists still like oil paints. Use natural bristle brushes for oil paints and get advice at the paint store on cleaning brushes and rollers.

Keep Paint Covered > Exposure to air causes latex paint to skim over, so it’s best to keep the can of paint covered whenever possible. Pour small amounts of paint into a roller tray or small cardboard paint buckets and work from those.

Drop Cloths > Newspaper won’t give your floors enough protection. Plastic sheeting can be slippery. A good environmentally-friendly choice are large heavy canvas drop cloths available at paint stores or home centers. These can be folded to fit most any size room, are not slippery, and can be reused endlessly. Tape down the edges so spills won’t get under the cloth. If you have hardwood floors be sure to vacuum them before putting a drop cloth down.

Tinted Primer > When you purchase paint ask to have cans of primer tinted to match your wall color. Lighter colors can be matched fairly well, though primers won’t take enough pigment to match deeper wall colors. Using tinted primer can often save painting an extra finish coat. Some ceiling white paint is being marketed that is tinted blue when wet, drying to white, which may offer better control and coverage during painting.

Blue Tape > Painter’s blue tape is available in several widths. It is strong yet won’t pull up existing paint in most cases. The tape has a slightly waxy coating that helps seal out paint from seeping underneath. Simply “zip” down a length of tape with the back of a spoon or a knife blade in order to activate the seal. Test this on your surface first with the paint you’ll be using to see how well it works. The seal will only be effective on smooth surfaces. Also, use a minimum of paint near the tape to reduce the chances of seep-through. Remove blue tape when no longer needed, and leave it up only couple of days at the most.

Painting Tips I have some simple tips that will help you out while you are painting.

You can run into snags with any project and painting is no exception. I have some simple tips that will help you out while you are painting.

1. If you forgot to grab a paint stick at the store, don’t worry. Grab a wire coat hanger. Bend it in half so you have two legs and a handle. Use that to mix the paint. I recommend the heavier metal hangers as opposed to the lightweight white variety.

2. Before you pour paint, put a strip of duct tape around the edge of the can; then pour. Let the excess drip back inside and remove the tape. You’ll have a nice clean rim.

3. Prep, if you need to paint window frames it can take forever to tape them all up. Instead try grabbing your lip balm. Just run it around the edges of all the windows. This will allow you to simply wipe away any drips when you’re finished.

4. Hard to reach corners? No problem, and no need to perch yourself on a ladder. Tape a fine tipped paintbrush to an extension pole and use it to access those out of reach areas. If a hard to reach spot is a ceiling line try taping a chisel-tip foam brush for nice clean edge.


Painting tips & tricks

Rub petroleum jelly on the hinges and door knobs before you start to paint a door. If you get paint on them, they will wipe off easily.

To keep white paint from yellowing, add 2 drops of black paint to each Gallon of white.

When painting ceilings, cut a child’s rubber ball in half and put your paint brush in one of the halves to catch the drips.

An old pair of swimming goggles will protect your eyes from paint splatters and drips when painting ceilings.

When painting, protect your hands and face with moisturizer. Cleanup will be easier and the moisturizer will prevent paint from seeping into the pores.

To stop paint from dripping, punch a few holes in the rim of the paint can. When the brush is wiped against the edge, the paint flows back into the can. The lid covers the holes so the paint won’t dry out.

Before pouring paint from a can, cover the rim with masking tape. After pouring, remove the tape — the rim will be clean and the cover will fit tightly.

To remove lumps from paint: Cut a piece of screen to fit the inside of the paint can. Set it on top of the paint and let it float down to the bottom of the can. It will take all the lumps with it, trapping them at the bottom of the can.

When painting a room, dip a small card into the paint so that you have the exact colour with you and can match accessories in store.

When painting inside corners, trim the paint brush bristles to a V to save strokes and spread paint more easily.

When you poke a paint brush into corners or allow it to rest on the bottom of the paint can, the bristles curl and stray. To straighten natural bristles (not synthetics), try wrapping the brush in a couple of thicknesses of damp cloth and press gently with an iron. The steam and cloth binding do the job. Only light pressure is needed. Let the bristles cool before you unwrap the brush.

When painting old woodwork fill in the holes or cracks with a mixture of flour and some of the paint you are using. It hardens like cement and matches perfectly.

Painting tips – Cool Tip

If you are using water based paints, on a hot day, spraying walls with water before you paint will cool them down and make the job faster and easier – you can even paint them when they are damp.


Rolling. Dip your roller in the paint tray and then roll it back and forth on the ridged part of the tray. This squeezes out excess paint and evenly spreads the paint all the way around the roller.


When painting, start with diagonal or zigzag strokes to get the paint on the surface.


Paint each surface in blocks of roughly 4 feet by 4 feet. Paint adjacent blocks before each previous block dries. This will blend the edges together and help prevent lap lines. When using glossier paints, paint smaller areas at a time. Glossier paints have a greater tendency to show lap lines.


Brushing tips. When painting molding and woodwork with a brush, you can mask off adjacent areas that you do not want to paint (for instance window panes). Use wide masking tape along the edge you want to maintain.


With a little practice you can learn to “cut” in your paint edge and avoid the hassle of masking things off. With a steady hand, guide the brush along the surface you are painting, allowing a few bristles to overlap the adjacent surface by about 1/16″. Strive for a smooth, even line. Paint with the grain of the wood. Use short strokes to coat the surface with paint, the go back over the area with longer, smoother strokes for an even, finished surface.


Paint a room! The order in which to paint a room is essentially top to bottom. That means start with the ceiling, then do the walls and finally paint all the woodwork. To paint a ceiling, begin by painting the edge of the ceiling along the walls with a brush. Paint out about 2″ to 3″ onto the ceiling. This will provide an area to overlap with the roller.


The easiest way to paint a ceiling is with a roller and an extension handle. This allows you to stand on the floor while you paint. If need be, you can use a stepladder, but it is much slower going and awkward. Start in the corner of the room and work your way across the narrowest dimension of the room with a band about 4 feet wide. Continue back and forth across the room until you are finished.


When the ceiling is dry, you can start painting the walls. Start by using a brush to paint corners, ceiling lines and areas adjacent to woodwork. Paint one entire wall or area at a time.


Use the roller and work your way across the room, from the ceiling down to the baseboards.


Use the roller and work your way across the room, from the ceiling down to the baseboards.


When the walls are dry, you can start to paint the woodwork. This will probably be the most time consuming part of the project and requires a fair amount of patience. Use a good sash brush. They are worth the extra cost. Paint with the grain of the wood. When painting windows, paint the sashes first. Then work your way down the window casing to the sill. Don’t paint moving parts, like sash cords and pulleys, or the sash channels.


On raised panel doors, paint the panels first. Then work your way from the top to the bottom of the door.


If you desire, flat panel doors can be painted with a roller for quick application.


Paint Disposal

If you´re like most people, you´ve probably got a can or two of old paint sitting around in the garage. Paint doesn´t last forever, so what do you do when you want to get rid of the old stuff? Most garbage services won´t pick up sealed paint cans because they could rupture and drip all over the neighborhood. Here´s a great solution:

If you´ve just got a little paint left, just leave the can open until the paint hardens. For more paint, pour it onto a big piece of cardboard and leave it outside until the solvents evaporate, then just throw the whole thing away. Of course, if you´ve got kids or pets, put your cardboard in a safe place, where they can´t get to it.