How Much Paint Should I Buy

Generally, one gallon of paint will cover approximately four hundred square feet of wall space. Keep in mind, however, that this is just a rough estimate. Some paint (usually higher quality paint) will cover more area, and some paint may take two or three coats to cover that same amount of space. When buying paint, talk to the customer-service representative. He or she will be able to tell you how well the paint will perform, and you can thus buy accordingly.

• How do you tell what four hundred square feet of wall space looks like? Well, you measure your wall multiply (yes, you do need it after school) the length of the wall by the height to get the square footage. For instance, if your wall is ten feet long and eight feet high, your square footage is eighty feet.

• There is interior paint and exterior paint. Check the label to be sure that you are buying the right paint for the job.

• What about trim paint? The trim is usually a different color from the walls of the home it can be lighter or darker, depending on your preference. For every six gallons of wall paint, you will need one gallon of trim paint. If you have a lot of trim around windows and doors, it might push your need to two gallons per every six. Trim paint is no different from regular paint—except, of course, for the color.


Interior Painting – Frequently asked questions

Can I paint directly over wallpaper?
No. Wallpaper can be painted over with the proper preparations. Be sure to remove any loose wallpaper, scuff/sand the surface, then apply interior oil-based primer.

Can I apply latex paint over oil based paint?
Yes. Be sure to prepare the surface properly before painting. Oil-based paints should be sanded to a flat finish before painting. After rinsing, apply Dutch Boy® oil-based primer and apply desired latex paint.

Can I apply paint directly over a semi-gloss paint?
No. Semi-gloss paint must be dulled to a flat finish by sanding*, allowing proper adhesion. Removing or disturbing old paint from interior or exterior surfaces by sanding, scraping, abrading or other means may produce dust, debris or fumes that contain lead. Exposure to lead dust, debris or fumes may cause brain damage or other adverse health effects, especially in children and pregnant women. Structures built before 1978 should be tested by a licensed inspector prior to removing or disturbing old paint.

Can I use exterior paint on the inside of my house?
No. Exterior paints are formulated to be more flexible to withstand temperature and climate change.

How can I best prepare my walls before I paint?
Walls that have never been painted should have a recommended primer applied before painting. For previously painted walls, thoroughly wash them with a mild soap and water solution, then rinse with clean water. If your existing surface was painted previously with semi-gloss paint, the surface should be lightly sanded to a duller finish. If the walls have not been painted in five years or longer or are stained then primer should be used.

How much paint do I need?
To achieve one-coat coverage, paint should be applied at a maximum of 400 square feet per gallon. Rough or textured surfaces may require more paint. On these areas allow for 125-300 square feet per gallon.

How do I prepare the surface?
As a general rule, all surfaces should be clean before painting. Remove any loose, peeling paint, and/or any other substrate that is on the surface*. Scrub all surfaces to remove all dirt, grease, oil, etc. Rinse surface well and allow to dry. Apply appropriate patching material to cracks, nail holes, or other surface imperfections, sand smooth, and remove sanding dust.

*If your existing surface is glossy, dull surface by sanding or use an abrasive cleaner. Remove any residue.

How do I take care of my freshly painted surface?
Freshly painted surfaces may be washed after 30 days. Avoid touching, wiping, or wetting any freshly painted surface for 30 days. After that time dirt and stains may be removed with a mild, non-abrasive cleaner and water. Do not place objects on windowsills and shelves until paint is thoroughly dry.

How long should I wait before applying a second coat of paint?
A second coat of latex paint may be applied 6 hours after the first coat. With oil-based paint, you should wait 24 hours between coats.

Should I paint the trim before or after I roll the walls?
The wall area around the doors and windows and along the ceiling should be cut in with a brush, this will prevent the wall from having an obvious and unsightly picture frame effect. Then, the main part of the wall can be painted with a roller, rolling into these areas.

Why do I need to use a primer?
Primers are specifically formulated to seal porous surfaces, block stains, as well as to insure the proper adhesion of the topcoat and produce the best possible coverage.

What is the proper order to follow when painting a room?
When painting a room, the ceiling should be painted first, followed by the walls, then the trim (including doors and windows) and finally the baseboards.

When should I apply?
Room and surface temperature should be between 50 and 85 degrees. Paint dries best between 65F and 85F. Allow at least 4 hours of drying time before recoating.

What is the proper rolling technique?
Fully load the roller with paint by dipping the entire cover deep into the tray of paint. Carry as much paint to the surface as possible. Make a letter “V” in a small 2 foot by 2 foot area with a generous roller load of paint. Fill in the “V”, spreading the paint evenly from left to right. Lightly smooth out with downward motions. Repeat “V” with a freshly loaded roller for every 2 x 2 foot area.

Design by Room – Entrance Door Mat Materials You Should Avoid

An entrance door mat can either be of the indoor or outdoor variety. Indoor mats are also known as absorbent floor mats while outdoor mats are non-absorbent. Although closely related, the two types are quite distinct from one another in terms of function and material. While each could, in theory, pass for the other, it would not be in the best interest of a clean house. That being said, given the fact that the outdoor entrance mat is first encountered when someone steps up to the threshold of a home, there are some materials that should be avoided. Otherwise you could end up with dirt-covered floors or carpets and be left with a relatively useless outdoor mat. Here, then, are 3 materials you should never use for outdoor entrance mats.

Carpet-Topped, Rubber-Backed

Basically, any absorbent material should be avoided when it comes to outdoor entrance mats. Outdoor mats should be non-absorbent instead. Their job is to take off the vast majority of debris, mud, dirt or snow from the bottom of your shoes. They are non-absorbent, so whatever is wiped from your shoes can be easily hosed or pressure washed off when it is time to clean the mat. Carpet-topped mats are very absorbent. They are designed for indoor use by clearing the bottom of your shoes of moisture that might cause you to slip. To clean them, they are thrown in the laundry. Used outdoors, carpet-topped mats would get saturated by mud and other debris and be virtually useless after a few mucky days. If used to remove excess snow, they would become damp so quickly that they would fail to serve their purpose.

Bamboo

While bamboo is fairly non-absorbent, when used for outdoor mats the material tends to get very dirty quickly. If bamboo is exposed to the rain, it will look terrible after enough dirt piles up on it. Aside from that, bamboo mats, especially thin mats, are quite useless at scraping heavy amounts of gunk off of shoes. Thicker bamboo mats can withstand a lot of water saturation, although they are nonetheless ineffective at keeping mud and other debris from getting inside. Bamboo mats are decorative, but they are best used in a place where their primary function is adornment or light cleaning of shoes.

Woven Cloth

Woven cloth may be very durable, but like carpet it is extremely absorbent and will get very damp if exposed to rain or snow. Not only that, but it may never fully dry especially if it is thick. Like carpet mats, woven cloth should be used for indoor mats only, there to absorb what moisture remains on the bottom of your shoes. The organic fibers will get clogged with mud and other outdoor debris, and soon you will be left with a dirty, damp mat.