How to heat strip wood

1. Hold the heat gun about 4 inches away from the wood, using slight back-and-forth motions.

2. The paint should start to soften and begin to blister. Be careful not to overheat the paint since it will turn into a paste that is hard to remove. Remember, too, that wood is a flammable material and can be scorched or catch fire.

3. Remove the heat and start scraping the paint from wood with a metal scraper.

4. Repeat steps until the paint is mostly removed.

5. Use the rough sandpaper to sand down any sections that still have paint.

6. Use the fine sandpaper over the entire surface to create a clean, smooth surface for painting.

7. Wipe down the wood with a damp cloth.


Handy Person Tips

1. Rub petroleum jelly on the hinges and door knobs before you start to paint a door. If you get paint on them, they will wipe off easy.
2.To keep white paint from yellowing, add 10 drops of black paint to each quart of white.
3. When painting ceilings, cut a child’s rubber ball in half and put your paint brush in one of the halves to catch the drips.
4. An old pair of swimming goggles will protect your eyes from paint splatters and drips when painting ceilings.
5. When painting, protect your hands and face with moisturizer. Cleanup will be easier and the moisturizer will prevent paint from seeping into the pores.
6. Before starting to paint with enamel paint, lightly coat your hands and underneath your fingernails with any name brand hand cleaner. After the painting is finished, your hands will be easy to clean.
7. Line your paint tray with aluminum foil. When its time to clean up, just roll up the foil and throw away.
8. To stop paint from dripping, punch a few holes in the rim of the paint can. When the brush is wiped against the edge, the paint flows back into the can. The lid covers the holes so the paint won’t dry out.
9. To remove lumps from paint: Cut a piece of screen to fit the inside of the paint can. Set it on top of the paint and let it float down to the bottom of the can. It will take all the lumps with it, trapping them at the bottom of the can.
10. When painting trim around windows, doorways , etc., try using stiff paper to cover the area you don’t want painted. (An old phone book cover works well.) Slide paper along as you paint. It’s much faster and more economical than using masking tape. Works well with either a roller or brush.
11. When painting a room, dip a small card into the paint so that you have the exact color with you and can match accessories in stores.
12. When painting inside corners, trim the paint brush bristles to a V to save strokes and spread paint more evenly.
13. Before pouring paint from a can, cover the rim with masking tape. After pouring, remove the tape — the rim will be clean and the cover will fit tightly.
14. When you poke a paint brush into corners or allow it to rest on the bottom of the paint can, the bristles curl and stray. To straighten natural bristles (not synthetics), try wrapping the brush in a couple of thicknesses of damp cloth and press gently with an iron. The steam and cloth binding do the job. Only light pressure is needed. Let the bristles cool before you unwrap the brush.
15. When painting old woodwork, fill in the holes or cracks with a mixture of flour and some of the paint you are using. It hardens like cement and matches perfectly.

How To Strip Wallcoverings


1. Find a loose corner and pull upward. If there are no loose corners, use a putty knife to pry one loose and pull. If the paper comes off easily, your home free. Just keep pulling until it’s all off the walls.


2. Dilute wallpaper remover in water, according to the manufacturer’s directions. Wash the walls, working from the top toward the bottom of the walls. Rinse the walls with clear water and let them dry completely.

HOW TO REMOVE STUBBORN WALLCOVERINGS


1. If the wallcovering doesn’t pull off easily, it’s time to bring in the big guns. Cover the floor with drop cloths, and then dilute wallpaper remover in a bucket of water, following the manufacturer’s directions.


2. Run a perforating tool over the surface of the wallcovering. (It creates holes that let the remover solution penetrate the surface to loosen the adhesive.)


3. Use a pressure sprayer to apply the remover solution. Let the solution soak into the covering, according to the manufacturer’s directions.


4. Scrape away loosened wallcovering with a wide drywall knife. Be careful not to damage the wall behind the paper, and make sure you remove any backing paper or other layers.


5. Rinse adhesive residue from the wall with remover solution. Rinse with clear water and let the walls dry.


TIP:

To check the cleaned wall for remaining adhesive, holes, or other flaws, illuminate the wall from the side, using a bright light. Inspect the walls carefully, making sure they are completely clean and repaired before painting or hanging new wallcovering.

GLAZING WOOD – Strip and sand the wood to prepare for glazing

Strip and sand the wood to prepare for glazing. Dilute a quantity of latex so that it penetrates beneath the surface of the wood. Test the diluted paint on a small area to check the consistency.


1. Apply the diluted paint freely with a large decorating brush. Brush in the direction of the grain, covering the wood in small areas at a time.


2. When the paint is nearly dry (test an area), gently wipe over the paint with a lint cloth in one direction to expose the underlying wood grain.


3. Leave the paint to dry overnight and check that you like the tone. If it is too weak, apply another coat. Follow by sanding with fine sandpaper.


4. The final stage is to clean the wood. Run across the surface with a dry decorating brush and afterward wipe over with a damp cloth.